mind

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mind

1. the human faculty to which are ascribed thought, feeling, etc.; often regarded as an immaterial part of a person
2. intelligence or the intellect, esp as opposed to feelings or wishes
3. (in Cartesian philosophy) one of two basic modes of existence, the other being matter

mind

the mental faculties, mental experience of the human individual, involving self-consciousness, ‘free will’, thinking processes and unconscious processes. It is a hypothetical, and sometimes metaphysical, construct, which expresses a holistic capacity based on the neurophysiological processes of the brain, yet additively becoming more than these, i.e. an emergent property. Philosophically, there are disagreements about the way to express these properties. Major disputes have existed on the mind-body relation, on whether or not mind and body are to be conceptualized as separate ‘immaterial’ and ‘material’ realms (See DUALISM. MATERIALISM). Related debates (in PSYCHOLOGY) surround the doctrine of BEHAVIOURISM, that scientific psychology can proceed only by analysis of overt behaviour, not mental events. It should be noted, however, that doctrines such as philosophical materialism, which reject a dualism of mind and body, are not necessarily committed to a denial of ‘emergent properties’ of mind for many explanatory purposes. See also STRATIFICATIONAL MODEL OF SOCIAL ACTION AND CONSCIOUSNESS.

mind

[mīnd]
(psychology)
The sum total of the neural processes which receive, code, and interpret sensations, recall and correlate stored information, and act on it.
The state of consciousness.
The understanding, reasoning, and intellectual faculties and processes considered as a whole.
The psyche, or the conscious, subconscious, and unconscious considered together.
References in classic literature ?
Few things are more firmly established in popular philosophy than the distinction between mind and matter.
Yet there is one little trait in the description which shows that they are present to Plato's mind, namely, the remark that the soul, which had seen truths in the form of the universal, cannot again return to the nature of an animal.
It was at once deeply impressed upon my mind, that, if Mr.
Now she would be able to devote herself to large yet definite duties; now she would be allowed to live continually in the light of a mind that she could reverence.
Franklin took one of his sudden resolutions, and went out precipitately to quiet his mind by a long walk.
The method used in both these searches after truth and after gold, being indeed one and the same, viz., the searching, rummaging, and examining into a nasty place; indeed, in the former instances, into the nastiest of all places, A BAD MIND.
I don't remember ever being see-saw in that way, when I'd made my mind up, as you say, that a thing was wrong.
Miss Garth went back to the suffering woman, with the burden on her mind of one anxiety more.
"My dear Manette, it is the case of an old and a prolonged shock, of great acuteness and severity to the affections, the feelings, the--the--as you express it--the mind. The mind.
All that was most firmly established in her mind was rocking.
"I suppose, if the cat had been gone, instead of the piglet, your mind's eye would see the piglet eating the cat," suggested the Scarecrow.
When he has satisfied himself, in general and in detail, that it was made by such a person as he, so armed and so motived, and to ends to which he himself should also have worked, the problem is solved; his thought lives along the whole line of temples and sphinxes and catacombs, passes through them all with satisfaction, and they live again to the mind, or are now.