moral


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Related to moral: Moral development

moral

Law (of evidence, etc.) based on a knowledge of the tendencies of human nature

MORAL

Mentioned in "An Overview of Ada", J.G.P. Barnes, Soft Prac & Exp 10:851-887 (1980).
References in classic literature ?
"Down, you base thing!" thundered the Moral Principle, "and let me pass over you!"
Conflicting moral codes have been no more than the conflicting weapons of different classes of men; for in mankind there is a continual war between the powerful, the noble, the strong, and the well-constituted on the one side, and the impotent, the mean, the weak, and the ill-constituted on the other.
"For moral courage is a worthless asset on this little floating world.
`Everything's got a moral, if only you can find it.' And she squeezed herself up closer to Alice's side as she spoke.
He had learnt his craft at the school of Alexander Pope, and he wrote moral stories in rhymed couplets.
"CON tal que las costumbres de un autor," says Don Thomas de las Torres, in the preface to his "Amatory Poems" "sean puras y castas, importo muy poco que no sean igualmente severas sus obras" -- meaning, in plain English, that, provided the morals of an author are pure personally, it signifies nothing what are the morals of his books.
The construction of a fable involves a minute attention to (1) the narration itself; (2) the deduction of the moral; and (3) a careful maintenance of the individual characteristics of the fictitious personages introduced into it.
As to whether any moral change accompanies a physical one, I can only say that I have met no proof of the fact.
(1) Which of the two sovereigns is imbued with the Moral law?
The boundaries of personal influence it is impossible to fix, as persons are organs of moral or supernatural force.
"By Old and New World, my excellent associate," he said, "it is not to be understood that the hills, and the valleys, the rocks and the rivers of our own moiety of the earth do not, physically speaking, bear a date as ancient as the spot on which the bricks of Babylon are found; it merely signifies that its moral existence is not co-equal with its physical, or geological formation."
But that is not all, that is not his worst defect; his worst defect is his perpetual moral obliquity, perpetual--from the days of the Flood to the Schleswig-Holstein period.