MPEG-4


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Related to MPEG-4: MPEG-4 AVC, MPEG-4 part 10

MPEG-4

(compression, standard, algorithm, file format)
A video compression standard planned for late 1998. MPEG-4 extends the earlier MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 algorithms with synthesis of speech and video, fractal compression, computer visualisation and artificial intelligence-based image processing techniques.

References in periodicals archive ?
The first dropping method drops frames before the transmission of MPEG-4 media files and then sends the dropped files to the client.
Caracteristicas: Inalambrica, resolucion de 160 x 120, 320 x 240, 640 x 480 en 30 y 25 cuadros por segundo, audio de dos vias, envia imagenes MPEG-4 y JPG, soporta UPnP, DDNS, motion detection, video 3GPP, incluye software IP CamSecure Lite
"We expect recurring revenues from our MPEG-4 technology for many years to come.
"ESS DVD chipsets with Nero Digital certification will expand the availability of our superior MPEG-4 capabilities."
News from European broadcasters, in particular France, looks promising for MPEG-4.
MPEG-4 is well suited for both LANs and for virtually any IP network, including the public Internet.
So we decided to combine our high performance MPEG-4 codec technology with the top capture card and web-cam available to deliver this best of breed streaming solution packaged affordably for the multiple live web-casting markets."
* Part 4--Intellectual Property Management and Protection (IPMP)--to provide interoperability between IPMP tools, such as MPEG-4's IPMP hooks;
The first chapter gives you an insight into MPEG development from the early formats through to the latest MPEG-4. It also looks at the VRML language as it is linked closely with the development of MPEG.
And to increase the amount of available content, all common compressed digital formats, such as AVI, DV, MPEG-1, MIPEG-2, and MP3 can be transcoded into MPEG-4, while previously encoded MPEG-4 files can be transcoded to optimized MPEG-4 files.
MPEG-4 technology shrinks the size of multimedia files so that interactive video can be transmitted more quickly to computers, mobile devices and television set-top boxes.