MRAM


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MRAM

[′em‚ram]
(computer science)

MRAM

(Magnetic RAM) A non-volatile, random access memory technology that is designed to initially replace flash memory and, potentially, DRAM memory. MRAM uses magnetic, thin film elements on a silicon substrate that can be built on the same chip with the logic circuits. DRAM, SRAM and flash memories cannot all be embedded on the CPU chip.

Although many large companies, such as IBM and Intel, are working on MRAM, NVE Corporation, Eden Prairie, MN (www.nve.com) is a small company that is a leader in this field with more than 30 patents.

Similar and Different
Writing bits in MRAM is similar to magnetic disks and early magnetic core storage. The 0s and 1s are created by different polarizations of the electrons within a ferromagnetic material. The major difference between MRAM and other magnetic technologies is in the reading. MRAM uses a tunnel junction, and the bit is read as the resistance in that junction. See future memory chips, spintronics and core storage.


A Magnetoresisive RAM Bit
This diagram shows one magnetic bit in the Magnetoresistive RAM technology from NVE Corporation (www.nve.com). The data state (0 or 1) is determined by the polarization of the tunnel junction, and the bit is read as the resistance in that junction.
References in periodicals archive ?
MRAM uses magnetic storage to keep track of bits, in contrast to most current RAM technologies, which use electric charges.
Furthermore, compatibility with an asynchronous SRAM was achieved by inserting protocol transform circuits between the MRAM macro and I/O buffer circuits.
COMING ATTRACTIONS Scientists are considering where, beyond MRAM and oscillators, this new form of electromagnetic muscle is leading.
Because the spin state of the electron is stored magnetically, MRAM does not require a constant charge of electricity to maintain the polarity of each rail.
A memory technology that uses magnetic, rather than electronic, charges to store bits of data, MRAM could significantly improve portable computing products by storing more information, accessing it faster and using less battery power than the electronic memory used today.
Motorola has already developed a prototype lower-capacity MRAM, and IBM and Infineon Technologies have begun joint development.
MRAM is a next generation memory technology which is non-volatile, power efficient and operates at ultra-high speed.
By resolving one of the major obstacles to using STT MRAM, Fujitsu and the University of Toronto's new read-method marks a major step towards the practical implementation of STT MRAM as a necessary replacement for flash memory, in view of future requirements that will be necessary for compact and low-power electronic devices.
The MTJs in the MFF were created using the same process as the MTJs in the 250-MHz high speed MRAM that was originally developed, designed and fabricated by NEC, and features MTJ layers being incorporated into an inter-metal oxide layer.
Such quantum-mechanical junctions are the foundation of a fledgling memory technology called magnetic random access memory, or MRAM.
MRAM (Magnetic Random Access Memory) is a microscopic memory-cell technology that consumes little power and is non-volatile memory, meaning it retains data when power is shut off MRAM is much faster than Flash memory.