multiple sleep latency test

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multiple sleep latency test

[¦məl·tə·pəl ′slēp ‚lāt·ən·sē ‚test]
(medicine)
A test used to document pathologic sleepiness and diagnose narcolepsy in which recordings of brain waves, muscle activities, and eye movements are taken while a person spends the day in a sleep laboratory, taking naps at intervals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Activity, arousal, and the MSLT in patients with insomnia.
At its most basic level, an MSLT measures sleepiness.
In IH, evidence of hypersomnia must be demonstrated by an MSLT showing a mean sleep latency of <8 minutes or by PSG or wrist actigraphy showing a total 24-hour sleep time of >660 minutes.
Furthermore, standardized tests for assessing EDS are the MSLT and maintenance of wakefulness test.
In none of the patients did PSG data show any significant changes regarding overnight sleep or MSLT using linear mixed-effects models (Supplemental Table 1, Table 1).
Johns, "Sensitivity and specificity of the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT), the maintenance of wakefulness test and the epworth sleepiness scale: failure of the MSLT as a gold standard," Journal of Sleep Research, vol.
Polysomnography and MSLT were performed 13 months after the first presentation.
The Sleep Guidelines covers sleep studies performed at a sleep laboratory, such as polysomnogram ("PSG"), multiple sleep latency tests ("MSLT"), and maintenance of wakefulness test ("MWT").
We defined USA100 as any isolate identified as USA100 by PFGE or any isolate with 1) SCCmec type II and 2) either spa type t002 or MSLT type ST5.
Analiza wynikow innych badan pokazuje, ze nasilenie sennosci moze byc zwiazane z wiekszym ryzykiem wypadku drogowego, ale na podstawie wynikow MSLT (Multiple Sleep Latency Test--Test Wielokrotnej Latencji Snu) i punktacji w ESS nie udalo sie autorom niniejszej publikacji jednoznacznie okreslic wielkosci tego ryzyka [12].
Reduced snoring and objectively measured sleepiness by the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) were also found to be specifically related to the action of man- dibular advancement.5 In adults with predominately moderate to severe OSA, the short term (one month) use of an adjustable MAD was not inferior to CPAP in its impact on 24 hour mean ambulatory blood pressure, daytime sleepiness, disease specific and general quality of life.19 The main advantages of using ODs are that there is good patient compliance and the devices are noninvasive and relatively inexpensive; they can also be easily carried anywhere by the patient.
A score greater than 10 on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), or a mean sleep latency less than eight minutes on the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) (30,41,42) is considered inappropriate sleepiness during waking hours and has been under-recognized in PD.