MULTIBUS


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MULTIBUS

An earlier bus architecture from Intel used in industrial, military and aerospace applications. Introduced in the 1970s, there were many MULTIBUS products offered by the mid-1980s. MULTIBUS was later acquired by RadiSys Corporation and then U.S. Technologies, Inc. It was also adopted by the IEEE as the 796-1983 IEEE Standard Microcomputer System Bus, but IEEE withdrew the standard in 2015. MULTIBUS I (16 bits) and MULTIBUS II (32 bits) include message passing, auto configuration and software interrupts. See Intel.
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LLC nuclear energy unit has purchased the Multibus I product line from US Technologies Inc., the company said.
If you analyze the "autopsies" of many dead buses from the past, such as Multibus I and II, STDbus, EISA, and others, you find they all have the same two lethal defects: A synchronous architecture and commodity desktop-PC technologies.
The Prism system was originally based on the iRMX286 operating system running on Intel Multibus hardware.
So we must cope with Fieldbus, VMEFuturebus, Multibus, Standard Bus, Mod-bus, Bitbus, Serial Bus, Seriplex Control Bus, Genius I/O, Interbus-S, Sensoplex, DeviceNet, Universal Serial Bus, IEEE 1394 (Firewire), RS232, RS485, Lightbus, SERCO, Profibus (widely used in Europe), CEBus, LONWorks, Wor1dFIP, VMEbus/VXI, Compact PCI/PXI, PC/104, HPIB (IEEE-488), PLC Bus, CANbus and other buses as yet unheard of.
Depending on application, features of controls include: electroluminescent or LCD operator displays, high-speed event detection for real-time response, high-density/high-power digital I/O, analog I/O, closed-loop control, alarm and fault detection and display, on-board diagnostics, Multibus or ISA bus architecture, 386 microprocessors, DOS platform, plotting and graphics, real-time clock, soft keys, printer output, and auxiliary-equipment interface.
Titan Electronics, a domestically based manufacturer of Mil-Spec and ruggedized board modules for the embedded computer market, is converting from the multibus architecture to the VME world.