Ma Yüan

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Ma Yüan

(mä yüän), fl. c.1190–1225, Chinese painter of the Sung dynasty and foremost of the Ma family of painters. He became one of the most important landscape painters of the 12th and 13th cent., the other being Hsia KueiHsia Kuei
, c.1180–1230, Chinese painter of the Sung dynasty. Little is known of his life. He and his contemporary Ma Yüan were regarded as the greatest landscape painters of the day and were the founders of the so-called Ma-Hsia school of landscape painting.
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. He was known for his "one-cornered" compositions, in which dramatic effect was achieved by crisp, forceful brushstrokes, asymmetrical arrangement of elements, and drastic elimination of all but essentials. Attribution of his works is difficult because many later painters followed his style and because toward the end of his life he collaborated with his son Ma Lin, often signing his own name to his son's works. Landscape with Willows (Mus. of Fine Arts, Boston) is generally attributed to Ma Yüan, as are album leaves in the Cleveland Museum of Art and at the Metropolitan Museum in New York.

Ma Yüan

 

(Ch’in-shan). Born in the late 12th century; died in the first half of the 13th century, in the province of Shansi. Chinese painter. Active at the academy of painting in Hangchou.

A follower of Li T’ang, Ma Yuan painted landscapes (Solitary Fisherman on the River in Cold Weather, National Museum, Tokyo) and works in the “flowers and birds” genre (Plum Blossoms, Stones, and Wild Ducks in a Mountain Stream, Ku-kung Museum, Peking). Ma Yiian’s landscapes, monochromatic and tinted, profoundly reflect a philosophical conception of nature as a single and infinite world; they are characterized by a contemplative mood imbued with restrained excitement. Ma Yuan made wide use of new techniques in Chinese painting, such as asymmetrical composition (“off-center landscape”) and bold, broad strokes (“great blows with an ax”).

REFERENCES

Nikolaeva, N. S. Khudozhnik, poet, filosof: Ma Yuan’ i ego vremia. Moscow, 1968.
Chang An-chih. Ma Yuan, Hsia Kuei. Peking, 1959.
References in periodicals archive ?
From a tongue-in-cheek allegory of China and Tibet to the playful account of a young Tibetan in the throes of love, Ma Yuan breaks with tradition and helps move Chinese literature into the twenty-first century.
paintings of Ma Yuan, famous for his compositions that huddle the
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According to Dror, temples for Ma Yuan existed not only in the old capital Hanoi, but also in Co Loa, as well as in Thanh Hoa and Phuc Yen provinces.
The special value of The Lost Boat is its presentation of substantial work by some of these more radical writers - particularly Yu Hua, Ge Fei, and Ma Yuan - who for the most part are not otherwise available in translation.
The earliest selections, offered by Ma Yuan and Ge Fei, express a pronounced self-consciousness relative to the act of writing as these Chinese writers engage an alien culture in crisis and have difficulty finding terms to express the precise nature of that engagement.
In his notes to a selection by Hsu Hung-tsu Strassberg identifies fu-po as the "courtesy name" of Ma Yuan (p.
The intricate verbal designs captured by the author are reminiscent in their beauty and subtlety of the ink and color drawings on silk of the thirteenth-century Chinese artist Ma Yuan.
When, in August 1984, Ma Yuan published his first story, "Lasa he nushen" (The Goddess of the Lhasa River), in the local magazine Xizang Wenxue (Tibetan Literature), he emerged as a puzzle to most critics and readers.
Some critics think that Ma Yuan had not fully matured as a writer before his 1986 novella "Fabrication.
In "Flat Up and Down" he even appears together with Yao Liang and Lu Gao, surprisingly calling himself Ma Yuan.
Or, at times, the two even introduce each other as the author, as Yao Liang tells us: "Let me reveal the truth: Lu Gao is no other than Ma Yuan himself, who tries to wear a more pleasant mask" (Gangdisi, 282).