tamarind

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tamarind

(tăm`ərĭnd), tropical ornamental evergreen tree (Tamarindus indica) of the family Leguminosae (pulsepulse,
in botany, common name for members of the Fabaceae (Leguminosae), a large plant family, called also the pea, or legume, family. Numbering about 650 genera and 17,000 species, the family is third largest, after the asters and the orchids.
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 family), native to Africa and probably to Asia, but now widely grown in the tropics. The fruit, a brown pod from 3 to 8 in. (8–20 cm) long, has been an article of commerce since medieval times. Within the pod is a juicy, acid pulp used as an ingredient in chutneys and curries and formerly in medicines and for preserving fish. A refreshing drink is made by adding sugar and water to the pulp. A dye is obtained from the leaves. The tamarind is grown in the West Indies and Florida especially as a flavoring for guava jellies. Tamarind is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Leguminosae.

Tamarind

 

(Tamarindus indica), a tree of the family Leguminosae (subfamily Caesalpiniaceae). The tamarind grows to a height of 30–40 m. The tree has a diffuse crown and pinnatipar-tite leaves. The yellowish flowers are gathered into pendent race-miform inflorescences. The fruit is a pod as much as 15 cm in length, with a succulent tart-sweet pulp. The tamarind grows in the tropical regions of Africa and Asia. It is cultivated in the tropics as an ornamental and for its fruit, which is eaten fresh or dried and is used to make beverages, jams, and confections. The flesh of the fruit is used as a laxative. The wood is used to manufacture implements for pounding rice, as well as hammers, wheels, and furniture. In the USSR, the tamarind is cultivated in hothouses.

REFERENCE

Siniagin, I. I. Tropicheskoe zemledelie. Moscow, 1968.

tamarind

1. a leguminous tropical evergreen tree, Tamarindus indica, having pale yellow red-streaked flowers and brown pulpy pods, each surrounded by a brittle shell
2. the acid fruit of this tree, used as a food and to make beverages and medicines
3. the wood of this tree