Mabinogion


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Mabinogion

(măbĭnō`gēən), title given to a collection of medieval Welsh stories. Scholars differ as to the meaning of the word mabinogion: some think it to be the plural of the Welsh word mabinogi, which means "youthful career"; others think it derives from the Welsh word mabinog, meaning "aspirant to bardic honor." The stories in the Mabinogion are found in two manuscripts, the White Book of Rhydderch (c.1300–1325) and the Red Book of Hergest (c.1375–1425). The first four tales, which are called collectively The Four Branches of the Mabinogi, are divided into Pwyll, Branwen, Manawydan, and Math; their connecting link, now obscured by many accretions, is the story of Prince Gwri or, as he is later called, Pryderi. In the first tale he is born and fostered, inherits the kingdom and marries; in the second he is barely mentioned; in the third he is imprisoned by enchantment and released; and in the fourth he falls in battle. Another tale, the story of Kilhwch and Olwen, which was composed before 1100, is an early example of an Arthurian tale. The Dream of Rhonabwy, which was written before 1175, also contains Welsh traditions about King Arthur. A story apparently based on the legend of Emperor Maximus is The Dream of Maxim Wledig. Llud and Llevelys is a short folktale full of fairy tale elements. The last group in the Mabinogion consists of three Arthurian romances, Geraint, The Lady of the Fountain, and Peredur. It seems probable that the first two shared with the works of Chrétien de Troyes common sources written in French, and that the last drew on the vast body of Grail tradition. The Four Branches, Kilhwch, and the romances are invaluable in the study of the Arthurian legendArthurian legend,
the mass of legend, popular in medieval lore, concerning King Arthur of Britain and his knights. Medieval Sources

The battle of Mt. Badon—in which, according to the Annales Cambriae (c.
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. Using just the Red Book of Hergest as her source, Lady Charlotte Guest (1812–95) published the first English translation of the Mabinogion between 1838 and 1849; she also gave the volume its title. Later the White Book of Rhydderch was discovered, containing older, finer versions of the tales in Guest's work. In 1929, T. P. Ellis and J. Lloyd published a translation based on a composite of the tales in both the Red and White books. A later composite translation is The Mabinogion (1949) of Gwyn Jones and Thomas Jones.
References in periodicals archive ?
Branches, The Nature of Crisis is the brainchild of Argentinian choreographer Constanza Macras, inspired by the theme of transformation, the Welsh myths of the Mabinogion and landscapes plus a significant sight on any high street on a Saturday night - women out on a hen night, in fancy dress.
She quotes from the original sources frequently and at length (knowledge of Middle English is necessary to read them), with examples found in the works of Chaucer, Gower, and Malory, and in tales that include the Mabinogion, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and, of course, Beowulf, among others.
30pm The show is based on what is thought to be the oldest surviving Arthurian legend from The Mabinogion, a collection of ancient Welsh tales.
The Mabinogion is the inaccurate, but convenient, name of a collection of Welsh stories, the oldest dating from the eleventh century, the latest from the thirteenth.
The Mabinogion urn is a simple model of the spread of influences amongst versatile populations.
American Folklore Society award-winner Aaron Shepard launches a new "Ancient Fantasy" series with The Mountain of Marvels: A Celtic Tale of Magic, a chapter book retelling of medieval Welsh legends from "The Mabinogion.
In the Welsh folk-law classic The Mabinogion, the story is told of a giant king called Bendigeidfran.
This paper will concentrate on one of the Idylls from the 1859 edition, "Enid", which is based on the medieval "Geraint son of Erbin" from Mabinogion.
When she called on the AMs to be "bridges" between the people's aspirations and those who govern them, she was using a metaphor penned in the ancient Mabinogion tales.
Although Arthur is the hero of Welsh bardic tales and is certainly a magical figure in The Mabinogion, versions of the Arthurian legend exist in England, France and Germany.
In the Mabinogion tale of Culhwch and Olwen, written probably in Dyfed about 1100, the hero Culhwch is described as riding along in splendid clothes, with a 'four-cornered mantle of purple upon him, and an apple of red gold (aual rudeur) in each of its corners; a hundred kine was the worth of each apple'.
1375-1425) and was included in her translation of Mabinogion.