MacNeice


Also found in: Dictionary.

MacNeice

Louis. 1907--63, British poet, born in Northern Ireland. His works include Autumn Journal (1939) and Solstices (1961) and a translation of Agamemnon (1936)
References in periodicals archive ?
If it seems arbitrary to bring in Louis MacNeice as a point of comparison, the radio talk Curnow wrote after MacNeice's death in 1963 suggests otherwise.
My Oxford college was Christ Church, where MacNeice was friend to a German don named Stahl.
Four poems (Richard Cory (Edward Robinson), Call it a Good Marriage (Robert Graves), The Suicide (Louis MacNeice), and Rhyme against Living (Dorothy Parker)) give hints, but no details of triggers of suicide.
MacNeice explained that Quinlan's body language was evidence of his "conflicting duties and uncertainties", and added: "If he gets this wrong and pulls up before the line and it's not a void race, he's in a lot of trouble."
Do you recall how Louis MacNeice calls childhood the 'time of gifts'--the phrase used adopted by Patrick Leigh Fermor in one of the most glorious travel books of the 20th century?
He also makes a strong case for overlooked virtues in the verse of Louis MacNeice and John Updike.
We may also recall the glee of a very different poet, Louis MacNeice, at the drunkenness of things being various.
Six Poets: Hardy to Larkin, An Anthology, will contain more than 100 poems from Thomas Hardy, A E Housman, John Betjeman, W H Auden, Louis MacNeice and Philip Larkin, with Bennett's commentary discussing their style and charting his own reactions to their work.
She also heard the moving Sunday Poetry Salon event at MacNeice House, hosted by the Arts Council.
In what branch of literature was Louis MacNeice celebrated?
(157) Holdridge skillfully brings into relief the influences of other poets on Muldoon's work, showing how Muldoon responds to and re-reads such figures as Louis MacNeice, W.H.
Incorrigibly plural; Louis MacNeice and his legacy.