MacPaint


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MacPaint

An early, full-featured Macintosh paint program from Apple's Claris subsidiary that was originally developed by Apple and bundled with the Macintosh for two years. MacPaint was combined with MacWrite, and images from MacPaint could be inserted into MacWrite documents, making it quite the marvel for that era.

MacPaint's bitmap-based PICT file format was used for printing the screen. By pressing Command-shift-3, the current screen was stored in a PICT file for printing either in MacPaint or another program. In 1998, MacPaint was discontinued. See MacWrite and FatBits.


MacPaint on the First Macintosh
MacPaint was significant because its ease of use showed a novice audience what a graphics-based system could do. MacPaint and the Macintosh were rather slow, but the system was affordable. (Image courtesy of Apple Inc.)
References in periodicals archive ?
The machine had just 128KB of memory and had two applications - MacWrite and MacPaint - which were run on a 400KB floppy disk drive.
Creator of the MacPaint program, Bill Atkinson, recalled how Jobs pitched in recruiting him, as being a grad student at the time, he was reluctant to join but Apple flew him to Cupertino and Jobs personally convinced him.
"THE EIGHTIES CALLED, They Want Their Painting Back": This was one of LAURA OWENS's nicknames for a recent work, whose acid neons and dragged filigrees certainly suggest a gleeful bout with MacPaint circa 1984.
I bought one (it is still in my basement) and began to explore the new world of computing with tools like MacWrite, MacPaint, MacDraw, and a Professional Bibliographic System to help create and save bibliographies.
His other writing includes "MacCats -- 99 Ways to Paint a Cat with MacPaint" and "Maggie and the Moneysuckle Tree -- a Young Person's Guide to Building Wealth." Mr.
Each one came with the software package MacPaint. People who had bought a Mac to do nothing more exciting than write documents and calculate finances were able to experience the creative potential of a computer.
He borrows from Douglas Adams' reaction to using a Macintosh and MacPaint as "'that kind of roaring, tingling, floating sensation....in the blink of an eye ...all the teletypes and dumb terminals and character-based displays ...
It's reminiscent of the early GUI days and such programs as MacPaint that enabled just plain folks to instantly create drawings.
I allowed my students to "play" with MacDraw and MacPaint after they had completed assignments.
However, it is the ability of GIS to perform spatial operations (address matching, buffering, overlays, etc.) rather than the choice of database model that distinguishes GIS from the other computer programs (spreadsheets - Lotus 123, Quatro, etc.; statistical packages - Minitab, SAS, SPSS, etc.; drafting packages - Easy-CAD, etc.; and drawing packages - Coreldraw, MacPaint, etc.), which also utilize spatial data.[4] Address matching, buffering, and overlay capabilities are found in many different GIS software packages and they are used here to illustrate how some of the spatial operations could be applied to local government projects.
This new version stores 160,000+ images per catalog in file formats such as EPS (Mac/PC), PICT, TIFF, JPEG and MacPaint. Users can search across up to ten catalogs at one time, and images can be mounted locally or off-line.
Wonderful pictorial experiences await children who experiment with computer programs such as Kid Pix (1991) or MacPaint (1989).