Macaronic Verse

Macaronic Verse

 

comic or satirical verse interspersed with foreign words or words composed or altered in imitation of a foreign language.

Macaronic verse appears in the works of writers of antiquity (Roman poet Ausonius, fourth century B.C.); however, the term itself came into use in the 15th century in Italy, where it designated those burlesque poems whose language had a mixture of Latin and Italian words having Latin forms (for example, the poetry of T. Folengo, 16th century). In Russian verse, I. P. Miatlev created a vivid example of this language in his parody of the speech of the Francophiles among the Russian gentry (Sensations and Remarks of Madame Kurdiukova AbroadDans L’étranger). The macaronic style has also been employed in prose, usually for speech characterization (speech of the steward in the novel Fathers and Sons by I. S. Turgenev).

References in periodicals archive ?
In the European context, macaronic verse "entails not inserting foreign words but giving words of the poet's native tongue the inflectional endings of another language (Latin), yielding a comic mock-Latin." (17) More broadly, however, it could entail the alternating of sentences or phrases or the application of one language's morphological constructions to the other.
Macaronic verse could therefore be a serious and meaningful tool employed by poets to further the themes of their poems.
They focus on church documents and devotional publishing, poetry, warrants, and macaronic verse. The essays look at documents from the early modern period up the end of the 19th century.
Admittedly, key Latin texts with an obvious 'German' connection (Waltharius and Ruodlieb) are also discussed by Knight Bostock, but Linda Archibald's contribution on Latin prose and Stephen Penn's on Latin verse provide a far-ranging survey of the various kinds of literary material surviving from the Carolingian and Ottonian courts--be it narratologically complex beast epics, songs on Pythagorean subject-matter, liturgical tropes, or erotic macaronic verse. The inclusion of Latin material also means that there is some engagement with the works of female writers (Dhuoda, Hroswitha von Gandersheim).
There is nothing wrong with choosing to use Spanglish or Ebonics or composing novels in dialect or with macaronic verse, as long as one also has the ability to use the formal language of his or her homeland.
Italian popularizer of macaronic verse form, a synthetic combination of Italian and Latin first written by Tisi degli Odassi in the late 15th century.