Macarthur


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Macarthur

John. 1767--1834, Australian military officer, pastoralist, and entrepreneur, born in England. He established the breeding of merino sheep in Australia and was influential in founding the Australian wool industry

MacArthur

Douglas. 1880--1964, US general. During World War II he became commanding general of US armed forces in the Pacific (1944) and accepted the surrender of Japan, the Allied occupation of which he commanded (1945--51). He was commander in chief of United Nations forces in Korea (1950--51) until dismissed by President Truman
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
MacArthur was gone by the time of the largest United States surrender since the American Civil War.
Finally, the Waldorf Astoria meeting tells us how MacArthur's most famous warning--to "never fight a land war in Asia"--has come down to us, what he meant by it, and whether, in an age of American troop deployments in at least 133 countries, it retains its meaning.
The airline, which according to published reports flew out of MacArthur from June of 2016 to the following spring, plans to announce new destinations for 2019 and an expansion of service soon.
I suspect those men had never learned General MacArthur's true history in detail.
His black pipe visible from afar, the MacArthur statue cuts a solitary figure in the middle of the park, facing the land with Bonuan Blue Beach as backdrop.
Walker, MacArthur's ground component commander, tried with his understrength and poorly equipped Eighth Army to stop stronger, better-prepared North Korean forces during the chaotic and desperate first two months of the war.
Brands highlights another lesser-known aspect of the Korean War: MacArthur's desire to bring Chinese Nationalist forces into the fight.
Brands show that the clash between President Harry Truman and General Douglas MacArthur over the Korean war's course was the tipping point between two eras of American statecraft.
Through memoirs, personal diaries, official histories, and a large number of secondary sources, Borneman weaves together the pieces of his book with special emphasis placed on MacArthur's mercurial manner of commanding and on his relationship with his staff and with other military commanders, domestic and foreign.
MacArthur's accomplishments in war and in peace are legendary: he bravely and repeatedly led troops across "no man's land" during the First World War; as superintendent, he dragged West Point into the 20th century; he headed-up the U.S.
The dozens of biographies written about General Douglas MacArthur range in style from boys' adventure stories to hagiographies to the magisterial three-volume work of D.