Judas Maccabaeus

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Judas Maccabaeus

Jewish leader, whose revolt (166--161 bc) against the Seleucid kingdom of Antiochus IV (Epiphanes) enabled him to recapture Jerusalem and rededicate the Temple
References in periodicals archive ?
The final battle of Judas Maccabaeus against the Seleucid Greek general Bacchides was symbolic of the greater encounter, and indeed war, of the tiny Jewish population of Judea against the overwhelming cultural, social, economic, and military power of the Hellenistic empires left in the wake of Alexander the Great's conquest of the known world.
For example, one of the most beautiful and moving moments in this Judas Maccabaeus was in the air and chorus "Ah!
Handel's Judas Maccabaeus, performed by the Scottish Chamber Orchestra and star soloists, glorifies the Duke of Cumberland's victory in 1746 in which 2000 Jacobites died.
Handel's oratorio Judas Maccabaeus premiered at Covent Garden in 1747, the year after the last major land battle fought on British soil.
Some slaves, nevertheless, identified with Judas Maccabaeus and with Moses.
George Frederic Handel's oratorio "Judas Maccabaeus" will be the concert's featured centerpiece.
Their resistance, led by Judah Maccabaeus, culminated in the rededication of the Temple in 165 BCE, the event celebrated at Hanukkah.
Because of the sudden silence, everyone in the theatre heard the Princess's "Alas, poor Maccabaeus, how hath he been baited" (628).
Handel's "Sound an Alarm" from "Judas Maccabaeus" in a Faculty Artist Series recital Monday.
In contrast, the world-famous person, born in Halle, was Georg Friedrich Handel, of great composers, unique in his love not only of biblical but also post-biblical Jewish subjects: he composed Israel in Egypt, Jephtah, many other works, but also Judas Maccabaeus. Despite the words in Bach, my mother loved his music; in contrast, even in Handel's Messiah there are no anti-Jewish words.
Oratorios such as Saul, Israel in Egypt, Messiah, Samson, and Judas Maccabaeus guaranteed Handel a final repose at Westminster Abbey.
Rachel Cowgill of Leeds University's Department of Music found the manuscript of Judas Maccabaeus in Halifax.