McCarthy

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McCarthy

1. Joseph R(aymond). 1908-57, US Republican senator, who led (1950-54) the notorious investigations of alleged Communist infiltration into the US government
2. Mary (Therese). 1912--89, US novelist and critic; her works include The Group (1963)
References in periodicals archive ?
He told me, 'That's Seamie's, he made that for the Liam MacCarthy cup for a project in the Leaving Cert.
Alma is of course one of the 20th century's great characters, famed not just for her brilliance and her libido (MacCarthy quotes some eye-opening moments from letters), but also for her complexity and unreliability.
Gill first met McNabb at the home of Andre Raffalovich in Edinburgh in June, 1914 (MacCarthy 134).
Once the list of participants was confirmed and the subjects allotted, production of the work took place in the artist's studios with only email contact from MacCarthy. His occasional group emails reminded the group of the deadline, enabled the sharing of images by showing works in progress and helped connect the artists with one another.
"Gingerbread is the ultimate comfort food that spans generations--and everyone loves a gingerbread man cookie," O'Leary MacCarthy adds.
The two new chapters on Maud MacCarthy and John Foulds, the first and last, respectively, are among the strongest of the book.
Molly MacCarthy's memoirs were the first of the papers to be published (serialized in The Nation by Leonard Woolf and subsequently in the book A Nineteenth Century Childhood in 1924).
Ms MacCarthy works as a paralegal within the commercial litigation and sports law teams at the Leamington solicitors and outside of work competes as a para-equestrian dressage rider.
Fiona MacCarthy's new biography holds its own admirably beside those formidable predecessors, making excellent use of recently discovered sources that illuminate hitherto tenebrous aspects of the artist's life, including his wild, if largely epistolary, romances with a host of women--filling in a few of the gaps in Georgie's account, which remains understandably reticent on this score.
She is, in the words of MacCarthy, "an unequivocally positive portrayal of the empowered female" (73-74) who did not exist prior to Ariosto's writing.
MacCarthy also acquaints her readers with the quirky extravagance and intermittent eloquence of Burne-Jones's letters, scattered in a bewildering maze of public and private collections.
Irene MacCarthy has fought her bad health over the past few years, but has just recently found herself housebound as she struggles with pain in her hip as she waits for another bout of surgery.