Machine Building and Mechanical Engineering, Institutes of

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Machine Building and Mechanical Engineering, Institutes of

 

higher educational institutions that train engineers in general and specialized machine building and instrument-making, including electric machine building and instrument-making.

In the 1972-73 academic year there were 16 institutes of machine building and mechanical engineering in the USSR. Among them were 11 institutes of machine building: the Briansk Institute of Transportation Machine Building (founded 1930), the Voroshilovgrad Institute of Machine Building (1960), the All-Union Correspondence Institute of Machine Building (Moscow, 1936), the Zaporozh’e Institute of Machine Building (1930), the Kirovograd Institute of Agricultural Machine Building (1967), the institutes in Kurgan (1959) and Mogilev (1961), the Moscow Machine Tool Institute (1930), the Moscow Institute of Electronic Machine Building (1962), the N. E. Bauman Moscow Higher Technical School (1830), and the Rostov on Don Institute of Agricultural Machine Building (1930). There were five institutes of mechanical engineering: the institutes in Izhevsk (1952) and Leningrad (1932), the Leningrad Institute of Precision Mechanics and Optics (1930), the Moscow Institute of Automotive Mechanics (1939), and the Sevastopol’ Institute of Instrument-making (1964).

Most institutes not only offer daytime courses but also have evening, correspondence, and preparatory divisions and graduate schools. Some institutes have branches (departments or divisions) in other cities. The institutes in Moscow (with the exception of the All-Union Correspondence Institute of Machine Building), Leningrad, and Rostov on Don confer the doctoral and candidate’s degrees. The term of study at the institutes is five to six years. Graduating students must defend a diploma project and are granted the degree of mechanical engineer (or electromechanical, technological, or electrical engineer).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.