Mack Von Leiberich, Karl

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Mack Von Leiberich, Karl

 

Born Aug. 24, 1752, in Nennslingen, near the city of Weissenburg, Germany; died Oct. 22, 1828, in St. Polten, Lower Austria. Baron; Austrian field marshal.

Mack von Leiberich began serving in the war against France in late 1792 and was named commander in chief of the Austrian Army in Germany in September 1805. An incompetent military commander, he was surrounded by French troops and surrendered to Napoleon at Ulm on Oct. 20, 1805. (Mack von Leiberich had signed the document of surrender of his troops on October 17.) After his release from captivity, he was sentenced to death by an Austrian court martial in early 1806, but the death sentence was commuted to 20 years of detention in a fortress with deprivation of all ranks and orders. He was released in 1808 through the protection of Archduke Charles.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.