MacLisp


Also found in: Wikipedia.

MacLisp

(language)
A dialect of Lisp developed at MIT AI Lab in 1966, known for its efficiency and programming facilities. MacLisp was later used by Project MAC, Mathlab and Macsyma. It ran on the PDP-10. It introduced the LEXPR (a function with variable arity), macros, arrays, and CATCH/THROW.

MacLisp was one of two main branches of LISP (the other being Interlisp). In 1981 Common LISP was begun in an effort to combine the best features of both.

["MACLISP Reference Manual", D.A. Moon <moon@cambridge.apple.com>, TR Project MAC, MIT 1974].
References in periodicals archive ?
Concurrent logic programming was not yet a viable alternative to Prolog, though, as an initial study, Akikazu Takeuchi was implementing Relational Language in Maclisp in 1982.
We decided to develop a Concurrent Prolog implementation in a general-purpose language (C was considered first; Maclisp was chosen finally) to study implementation techniques.
We decided to build three interpreters in Maclisp, which differed in the multiple environment mechanisms necessary to evaluate the guard parts of program clauses.
5 up through MacLisp and InterLisp--and APL and SNOBOL as well--use dynamic scoping rather than lexical scoping [2].
Over the past 30 years a variety of Lisp dialects have been developed, including MacLisp [22], ZetaLisp [36], Franz Lisp [10], Portable Standard Lisp [14] and InterLisp [34] to mention just a few.
The first high-performance Lisp implementation was MacLisp on a PDP-10 [30] with special-purpose Lisp machines developed during the 1970s at MIT and Xerox PARC to follow.