Macpherson


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Macpherson

James. 1736--96, Scottish poet and translator. He published supposed translations of the legendary Gaelic poet Ossian, in reality largely his own work
References in classic literature ?
So now people begged Macpherson to travel through the Highlands and gather together as much of the old poetry of the people as he could.
For four months Macpherson wandered about the Highlands and Islands of Scotland, listening to the tales of the people and writing them down.
Macpherson was no longer a poor Highland laddie, but a man of world-wide fame.
Although at first Macpherson's book was received with great delight, soon people began to doubt about it.
Then in England people began to say that there never had been an Ossian at all, and that Macpherson had invented both the poems and all the people that they were about.
He read the poems and said that they were rubbish, such as any child could write, and that Macpherson had made them all up.
Johnson was far better known than Macpherson, most people agreed with him and believed that Macpherson had told a "literary lie," and that he had made up all the stories.
Johnson and Macpherson were very angry with and rude to each other.
The Macphersons were poor, but they saw that their son was clever, and they determined that he should be well taught.
CECILY:--"This is Cousin Ebenezer MacPherson on the Markdale road."
"It's a lesson to you that you can't deceive me, Constable MacPherson," said Lestrade, with dignity.
Macpherson called the book Sun Traveller because "of a name which was given to him by a Jesuit priest.