Macrocystis


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to Macrocystis: macrocytosis, Nereocystis

Macrocystis

 

a genus of marine brown algae of the order Laminariales. They are the largest algae, measuring up to 45 m. They consist of a flexible branching stalk with rhizoids and leaflike blades with air bladders that support the branches and blades near the surface. There are three species. They are distributed in temperate waters of the southern and northern (only near the shores of California) hemispheres. They are mainly used to obtain salts of alginic acids.

References in periodicals archive ?
verrucosa 7 Salmo salar Laminaria japonica 8 Seriola quinqueradiata Macrocystis pyrifera 9 Sparus aurata Porphyra umbilicalis 10 Takifugu rubripes Saccharina latissima 11 Thunnus orientalis Ulva lactuca 12 U.
Once harvested, the macrocystis seaweed is freeze-dried near its source in Balclutha, before being sent to Oceangreen Organics certified manufacturer in Christchurch, where each batch is fully analysed to measure nutrition levels.
Algae also grew on the cable, particularly Macrocystis pyrifera on the shallower area of Cable A, and Laminaria sp.
In macroalgae, Garman et al., [10] recorded that the nuclear migration of Macrocystis pyrifera declines with exposure to 20 [micro]g [l.sup.-1]Cu.
Summary of blue rockfish and lingcod life histories; a reef ecology study; and giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera, experiments in Monterey Bay, California.
Only in one occasion (2.1%) fur seals were seen eating fish at the surface, and in other occasion it was associated with Macrocystis pyrifera kelp rafts.
Fucoidan from Macrocystis pyrifera has powerful immune-modulatory effects compared to three other fucoidans.
trabeculata, Macrocystis pyrifera) (Figura 2), la extraccion de mariscos y la caza del pulpo (Octupus mimus).
Ocean acidification and seaweed reproduction: increased C[O.sub.2] ameliorates the negative effect of lowered pH on meiospore germination in the giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera (Laminariales, Phaeophyceae).
Alginic acid also called algin or alginate is an anionic polysaccharide found in brown seaweed and marine algae such as Laminaria hyperborea, Ascophyllum nodosum, and Macrocystis pyrifera [61].
A profusion of marine plants and invertebrates occurred at the edges of the shore platforms and on East Reef in the intertidal zone, including seaweeds, kelp Macrocystis sp., cunjevoi Pyura sp., barnacles, limpets, chitons, mussels (mainly Xenostrobus sp.) and the gastropods Subninella sp.