invertebrate

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invertebrate

invertebrate (ĭnˌvûrˈtəbrət, –brātˌ), any animal lacking a backbone. The invertebrates include the tunicates and lancelets of phylum Chordata, as well as all animal phyla other than Chordata. The major invertebrate phyla include: the sponges (Porifera), coelenterates (Cnidaria), echinoderms (Echinodermata), flatworms (Platyhelminthes), roundworms (Nematoda), segmented worms (Annelida), mollusks (Mollusca), and arthropods (Arthropoda). Invertebrates are tremendously diverse, ranging from microscopic wormlike mezozoans (see Mezozoa) to very large animals such as the giant squid. Approximately 95% of all the earth's animal species are invertebrates; of these the vast majority are insects and other arthropods. Invertebrates are important as parasites and are essential elements of all ecological communities.

Bibliography

See A. Kaestner, Invertebrate Zoology (3 vol., 1967–70); R. D. Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology (5th ed. 1987); R. Buchsbaum et al., Animals without Backbones (3d ed. 1987).

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invertebrate

[in′vərd·ə‚brət]
(invertebrate zoology)
An animal lacking a backbone and internal skeleton.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

invertebrate

any animal lacking a backbone, including all species not classified as vertebrates
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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Importance of environmental factors for the richness and distribution of benthic macroinvertebrates in tropical headwater streams.
Only two IBIs based on aquatic macroinvertebrates have been developed for freshwater ecosystems in Mexico.
These macroinvertebrates improve soil physico-chemical conditions through their diversified feeding (ingestion, digestion and ejection) and foraging (tunneling, boring, mining, movement) activities (Lavelle et al., 1997; Jouquet et al., 2006; Jimenez et al., 2008).
In addition to EPT and MSC, macroinvertebrates data were also grouped according to pollution tolerance and graphed against imperviousness (Figure 4).
Sampling and Identification of Benthic Macroinvertebrates. Minimum of 100 individuals of benthic macroinvertebrates were collected, stored, and transported by each sampling station [20,21].
More recently, the index was also applied in the mild climatic conditions of the Argentinean Pampas where it performed well in identified pesticide effects on stream macroinvertebrates [18].
Having up-to-date information about the types of macroinvertebrates found in a stream section can trigger professional follow-up and, hopefully, prompt correction if needed.
A study by South Dakota researchers found a direct correlation between diet and growth structure among perch in six glacial lakes of South Dakota* That study reported that fast growth rates in high-quality perch populations of lakes Madison, Spirit, and Clear were due to diets primarily of macroinvertebrates, such as amphipods, chironomids, and corixids.
We measured wet biomass of all collected macroinvertebrates on an AND Corporation GR-202 balance in the laboratory.