macrolide

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macrolide

[′mak·rə‚līd]
(organic chemistry)
A large ring molecule with many functional groups bonded to it.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of macrolide antibiotics on various cell cultures in vitro: 2.
Drug induced cardiotoxicity remains a major limitation in standard and high dose macrolide antibiotics. It could be concluded from this study that the tilmicosin has not produced cytotoxicity, mutagenicity and genotoxicity at low concentrations under in-vitro conditions.
Schryer et al., "The general mode of translation inhibition by macrolide antibiotics," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol.
As a result, macrolide antibiotics have become the first choice for the treatment of MP in young children.
Of these 31 children, 21 (68%) had already been treated with 14- or 15-membered macrolide antibiotics before admission.
Macrolide antibiotics are not only active against Gram-positive bacteria but also against some other organism like Haemophilus influenza, Mycoplasma spp., Legionella spp., and Chlamydia spp., etc.
In the June 2013 issue of DukeMedicine HealthNews, we discussed the increased risk of arrhythmias, heart attacks and death from cardiovascular events from macrolide antibiotics used to treat respiratory infections.
The structure of a novel sugar component of polyene macrolide antibiotics: 2,6-dideoxy-L-ribohexopyrane, The Journal of Antibiotics, v.
Macrolide antibiotics have anti-inflammatory properties and there is evidence from cell studies in the laboratory that they can boost anti-viral immunity.
These interactions included angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and potassium-sparing diuretics; ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (SMX/ TMP); benzodiazepines or zolpidem and other medications; calcium channel blockers and macrolide antibiotics; digoxin and macrolide antibiotics; lithium and loop diuretics or ACE inhibitors; phenytoin and SMX/TMP; sulfonylureas and antimicrobial agents; theophylline and ciprofloxacin; and warfarin and antimicrobial agents or non-steroidal antiinflammatory drags.
Among patients, 92 (79%) were treated with macrolide antibiotics. Eighty-three patients (70%) attended or worked at schools.
Macrolide antibiotics such as azithromycin have immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties in addition to their antibacterial action.