Mad Hatter

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Mad Hatter

(pop culture)
The half-cocked haberdasher known as the Mad Hatter owes a tip of the hat for his notoriety to Batman's television appearances. In Batman #49 (1948) writer Bill Finger introduced Jervis Tetch—drawn by artists Bob Kane, Lew Schwartz, and Charles Paris to resemble the Mad Hatter as illustrated by Sir John Tenniel in author Lewis Carroll's children's classic Alice in Wonderland—as dwarfish thief who hides dangerous armaments like a gas-gun inside his towering top hat. The Mad Hatter proves little more than a headache for Batman and Robin, however, who quickly capture him. The Hatter was back, this time as a wild-eyed, wild-haired crackpot obsessed with collecting valuable headgear, in Detective Comics #230 (1956), where he nearly obtained Batman's cowl by spraying it with a radioactive chemical, forcing the hero to doff his mask. He returned in Batman #161 (1964), attacking the jurors who sent him to prison with an array of trick hats outfitted with weapons. This interpretation of the Mad Hatter and his comic-book appearances were adapted to live-action television as a pair of two-part episodes in ABC's Batman (1966–1968), with actor David Wayne in the role of Jervis Tetch. Wayne's Mad Hatter sported both an odd dialect and a top hat with a hinged lid that opened to reveal a hypnotic device. The second Mad Hatter was written off as an imposter once an updated version of the Aliceinspired villain reemerged in Detective #510 (1981). Throughout scarce 1980s sightings in Batman comics, the Mad Hatter employed mind-controlling devices, from chemicals to implanted microchips, for various crimes including extortion and kidnapping, and once nearly beheaded Batman with buzzsaw straw hats. Television offered the Hatter another shot at wider stardom in Batman: The Animated Series (1992–1995). Tetch—voiced by Roddy McDowell and redesigned by artist Kevin Nowlan as a lanky figure with a gargoyle-grin—was an introverted, lovesick scientist who kidnapped his secretary Alice, mentally manipulating her into a perpetual tea party as his fantasy bride. After four additional episodes, the animated Mad Hatter was reconfigured as a shorter, more macabre character for two episodes of The Adventures of Batman & Robin (1997–1999) and an installment of the WB's Superman cartoon (1996–2000); action figures of both animated incarnations were produced in the 1990s (a comics-inspired Mad Hatter figure was manufactured for the collectors' market in the 2000s). These various interpretations of the Mad Hatter have blended into the peevishly irrational version populating contemporary DC Comics titles. An expert hypnotist, the Mad Hatter committed one of his most monstrous crimes early in his career. As shown in the miniseries Robin: Year One (2000–2001), which retroactively chronicled the history of Dick (the original Robin, later Nightwing) Grayson, Tetch used doctored Walkmans to entrance Grayson's teenage classmates into becoming “Alices,” hosting a disturbing tea party. Fortunately the Boy Wonder stopped the Hatter before he could complete phase two of his plan: selling the girls into slavery in Asia. While he remains committed to dastardly haberdashery, the Mad Hatter, thanks to Batman's intervention, always finds Arkham Asylum for the Criminally Insane the perfect place to hang his hat.

Mad Hatter

crazy gentleman who co-hosts mad tea party. [Br. Lit.: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland]
See: Madness
References in periodicals archive ?
The Beach House in Roker is hosting a Mad Hatters and Mascots event to mark the 150-year anniversary of the publication of Alice in Wonderland and pay tribute to author Lewis Carroll, who was a regular visitor to the town.
THE Gareth Brooks saga and Germany's World Cup victory both made an appearance at Mad Hatters Day yesterday.
MAD Hatters dressed to impress at a tea party in Huddersfield.
Anyone wishing to host or take part in a Mad Hatters Tea Party on March 28 should visit www.
The Mad Hatters charity was started eight years ago in Solihull to give exciting days out to disabled children, and has grown to become one of the best known causes in the region.
WELSH recruitment agency Smart Solutions has raised more than PS8,000 by hosting a Mad Hatters Ball, in support of their nominated charity Bobath Children's Therapy Centre Wales.
Mad Hatters Masked Ball HERBERT ART GALLERY AND MUSEUM, COVENTRY DRESS up as the Queen of Hearts, Tweedledum and Tweedledee or the Cheshire Cat for The Herbert's Alice in Wonderland-themed Mad Hatter's Masked Ball for grownups.
26 playing the Bonus Video Slot Mad Hatters on 28 September.
Miss Alice in Wonderland Nicol Thompson, eight, from Llandudno, at the Mad Hatters tea party in the grounds of Chirk Castle yesterday Pictures: STACEY OLIVER
Barclays Wealth helped 800 sick and disadvantaged children from across the region enjoy a fun day out when the firm volunteered to support the Birminghambased Mad Hatters Children's Charity.
Patricks held a fabulous event: the Mad Hatters tea party
Dave and Carole Clarkson are putting the fun back into the disco world with their Darlington-based Mad Hatters mobile video disco.