Scudéry, Madeleine de

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Scudéry, Madeleine de

(mädəlĕn` də sküdārē`), 1607?–1701, French novelist. Prominent at the Rambouillet salon, she later had one of the chief literary salons of Paris. Her two principal works, Artamène; ou, Le Grand Cyrus (1649–53) and Clélie (1654–60), are long pseudohistorical novels, full of fashionable sentiment and preciosity. They were extremely popular and all were translated into English. On the title pages appeared only the name of her brother, Georges de Scudéry (zhôrzh), 1601–67, who was probably only a secondary collaborator. Georges wrote plays and other works and actively attacked Corneille's Cid.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1) Similar maps are published in the 17thcentury, but in 1654, Madeleine de Scudery, develops the idea when she illustrates her novel Clelie, histoire romaine (Clelie, a Roman History) (2) with the famous "Carte de Tendre" ("Map of the country of Love"), (3) a topographical and allegorical representation of sentimental conduct and practice.
Specifically, in the case of the oi or oy diphthong (moi becomes [mwe], espoir becomes [espwer]), proper observance of the period pronunciation could transport the listener to the backwoods of the Ardennes instead of to the refined salons of Madeleine de Scudery and the Comtesse de la Suze.
As members of the "precieuse elite," 17th-century poets such as Madeleine de Scudery and Henriette de Coligny de la Suze specialized in amusing courtly songs.
In the fourth chapter, Seifert analyzes masculinity within Madeleine de Scudery's salon (her Samedis) and her oeuvre.
In the second section, focusing on problems of identity and self-(im)perfection, Daniel Maher's "Corrompre la perfection--de la Carte de Tendre aux Royaumes d'Amour," examines the variations and distortions of Madeleine de Scudery's sentimental map in works by the abbe d'Aubignac (Royaume de Coquetterie, 1654), Tristan l'Hermite ("Le Royaume d'Amour," ?1654), and Paul Tallement (Voyages a l'Ile d'Amour, 1663 and 1664).
Madeleine de Scudery and her circle drew the most influential map of gallantry's labyrinths, inventing on the famous carte du tendre or "map of tenderness," the homeland of true gallantry.
DeJean describes a one-volume work that constituted the first publication of one of the most important writers of the seventeenth century, Madeleine de Scudery. This work was a reversal of and "forceful response to" the so-called Ovidian model of epistolary fiction in which a "seduced and abandoned" woman complains in letter form about the infidelity of her male lover.
She is as interested in the problem of city dirt and how it affected the movements and sensibilities of urban dwellers as in the analysis of Madeleine de Scudery's romances, John Donne's poems of urban perambulation, or visual representations of the Pont Neuf.
Their household heralded the seventeenth-century salon, such as Madeleine de Scudery's.
Her metaphor of the salon, although usually associated with the seventeenth century and writers such as Madeleine de Scudery, calls up a locus in which women played multifaceted roles--as writers, critics, and patrons--and allows Zimmermann to explore these roles in the preceding centuries.
"Bibliographie des oeuvres de Georges et de Madeleine de Scudery." Revue d'Histoire litteraire de la France (1933): 224-34; 412-25; 538-49.
Duggan (French, Wayne State U.) situates Madeleine de Scudery (1607-1701) and Marie-Catherine de'Aulnoy (1650-1705) in the context of cultural changes, especially for aristocratic women, in France during the second half of the 17th century.