Madurese


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Madurese

 

a people in Indonesia, inhabiting the island of Madura and the eastern areas of Java. There are about 8 million Madurese (1970; estimate). The language, similar to Sudanese and Javanese, belongs to the Indonesian languages; the religion is Islam. Occupations include livestock raising (mostly cattle, horses, and goats), agriculture (rice, corn, legumes, peanuts, pumpkins, tobacco), and, on the coast, fishing; crafts include pottery and the dressing of skins. Salt mining and trading are also important. The Madurese are skillful seafarers.

REFERENCE

Narody lugo-Vostochnoi Azii. Moscow, 1966.
References in periodicals archive ?
Traditional village structure in Madura differs in various respects from that in Java and, as a result of centuries long indirect colonial rule, Madurese village administration has followed a quite different course of development than did communities in areas under direct rule.
Ricklefs, "The Crisis of 1740-1 in Java: The Javanese, Chinese, Madurese and Dutch, and the Fall of the Court of Kartasura", Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, vol.
This volume examines the experiences and living conditions of two groups of people in contemporary Indonesia: peasants living in the village Krajan in rural Bondowoso, East Java, and Madurese migrants living in urban Samarinda in East Kalimantan.
(94) However, the ethnic conflicts in Kalimantan at the end of the New Order were fought by native Dayak and Malay communities against the Madurese, who were not state-sponsored but were spontaneous migrants.
Among men in four subsistence societies (the Efe foragers of East Africa, the Kipsigis agropastoralists of Kenya, the Madurese agriculturalists of Indonesia, and the Machiguenga horticulturalists of lowland Peru), fathers spent more time in childcare, more time engaged in commercial activities, less time in education, and less time chatting compared with non-fathers (Gray & Anderson, 2010).
Madurese Seafarers: Prahus, Timber and Illegality on the Margins of the Indonesian State.
Ham (1998) conducted an acoustic study on gemination in four different languages: Standard Hungarian, Levantine Arabic, Bernese, Indonesian Madurese, and confirms the results of Lahiri and Hankamer (1988) that the only acoustic correlate that significantly differentiates geminates from singletons is closure duration.
Crops that were unique to different parts of the world (like corn) became so well- integrated into different economies that, for example, most Madurese are incredulous that their staple dish of mixed rice and corn is a relatively recent development (within the last few hundred years) in their diet.
This was the case in Borneo (Kalimantan) in 2000 when the native Dayaks attempted to violently expel the transmigrated Madurese, killing thousands of them as national authorities looked on.
Indigenous place based cultural groups (Goebel, 2010), so named because of their regional locations, include the Javanese, Sundanese, Bantenese, Betawi, Tengger, Osing and Badui from Java; the Madurese from Madura; Malays, Batak, Minangkabau, Acehnese, Lampung and Kubu groups from Sumatra; the Dayak and Banjar from Kalimantan; Makassarese, Buginese, Mandar, Minhasa, Gorontalonese, Toraja and Bajau from Sulawesi; the Balinese and Sasak from the Sunda Islands; Nuaulu, Manusela and Wemale from the Moluccas; and Dani, Bauzi and Asmat from Papua.
Ethnic groups (2000 census): Javanese 40.6%, Sundanese 15%, Madurese 3.3%, Minangkabau 2.7%, others 38.4%.