Maghreb


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Maghreb

Maghreb or Magrib (both: mäˈgrĭb) [Arab.,=the West], Arabic term for NW Africa. It is generally applied to all of Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia but actually pertains only to the area of the three countries between the high ranges of the Atlas Mts. and the Mediterranean Sea. Some writers also included Spain—especially during its period of Muslim domination—in the definition. Isolated from the rest of the continent by the Atlas Mts. and the Sahara, the Maghreb is more closely related in terms of climate, landforms, population, economy, and history to N Mediterranean areas than to the rest of Africa. The region was united politically only during the first years of Arab rule (early 8th cent.), and again under the Almohads (1159–1229). The Arab Maghreb Union was established in 1989 to promote cooperation and integration among the Arab states of N Africa; its members are Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, and Tunisia. Envisioned initially by Muammar al-Qaddafi as an Arab superstate, the organization is expected eventually to function as a N African common market, although economic and political unrest, especially in Algeria, and political tensions between Algeria and Morocco over Western Sahara have hindered progress on the union's joint goals.
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Maghreb

, Maghrib
NW Africa, including Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and sometimes Libya
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The Maghreb alliance to support university performance will aim to support Maghreb universities in their efforts to be included in the Shanghai ranking by 2025, promote research and increase scientific publications.
"The situation has reached a point that Maghreb citizens neither understand nor accept.
"What is regrettable in the Maghreb, however, is that a dispute is allowed to continue for the purpose of disrupting the evolution of the Maghreb Union", the Sovereign deplored.
And after this axis used to affect the Maghreb bloc - whether positively or negatively - it is now affected by it, to the point where no bilateral or multipartite approach ensured the resumption of merely ordinary relations, which are neither problem-free nor the hostage of the problems.
Two years after the "Arab Spring", the Maghreb region - Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco and Tunisia - is still facing major challenges of achieving higher and more inclusive growth and creating jobs, especially for an increasing number of educated youth.
The communication http://ec.europa.eu/commission_2010-2014/fule/docs/news/20121219_joint_comm.pdf stresses in particular the development of energy cooperation, "an area where integration in the Maghreb could bring benefits both to partner countries and, in the longer term, to the European Union by opening the way for the export of renewable energy from Maghreb towards the EU.
Although rich in development potential and joined by common cultural and linguistic ties, the Maghreb ' made up of Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco and Tunisia, - is one of the least integrated regions in the world.
"We have proposed a wide range of measures to support efforts in this field while recognising that it is for Maghreb partners themselves to determine the extent and pace of integration," said EU Commissioner for Enlargement and European Neighbourhood Policy Stefan Fule in a statement.
Aujjar's comments came during a seminar 'Bridging the satellite space between the Maghreb and the Mashreq Countries of the Arab world' held as part of the Arab Media Forum 2010.