Maghreb

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Maghreb

or

Magrib

(both: mä`grĭb) [Arab.,=the West], Arabic term for NW Africa. It is generally applied to all of MoroccoMorocco
, officially Kingdom of Morocco, kingdom (2015 est. pop. 34,803,000), 171,834 sq mi (445,050 sq km), NW Africa. Morocco is bordered by the Mediterranean Sea (N), the Atlantic Ocean (W), Western Sahara (S), and Algeria (S and E).
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, AlgeriaAlgeria
, Arab. Al Djazair, Fr. Algérie, officially People's Democratic Republic of Algeria, republic (2015 est. pop. 39,872,000), 919,590 sq mi (2,381,741 sq km), NW Africa, bordering on Mauritania, Western Sahara, and Morocco in the west, on the
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, and TunisiaTunisia
, Fr. Tunisie, officially Republic of Tunisia, republic (2015 est. pop. 11,274,000), 63,378 sq mi (164,150 sq km), NW Africa. Occupying the eastern portion of the great bulge of North Africa, Tunisia is bounded on the west by Algeria, on the north and east by the
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 but actually pertains only to the area of the three countries between the high ranges of the Atlas Mts. and the Mediterranean Sea. Some writers also included Spain—especially during its period of Muslim domination—in the definition. Isolated from the rest of the continent by the Atlas Mts. and the Sahara, the Maghreb is more closely related in terms of climate, landforms, population, economy, and history to N Mediterranean areas than to the rest of Africa. The region was united politically only during the first years of Arab rule (early 8th cent.), and again under the Almohads (1159–1229). The Arab Maghreb Union was established in 1989 to promote cooperation and integration among the Arab states of N Africa; its members are Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, and Tunisia. Envisioned initially by Muammar al-QaddafiQaddafi, Muammar al-
, 1942–2011, Libyan army officer and dictator. He graduated from the Univ. of Libya in 1963 and became an army officer in 1965. In 1969 he formed, along with a group of fellow officers, a secret revolutionary committee and led (1969) a successful coup
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 as an Arab superstate, the organization is expected eventually to function as a N African common market, although economic and political unrest, especially in Algeria, and political tensions between Algeria and Morocco over Western SaharaWestern Sahara,
territory (2015 est. pop. 526,000), 102,703 sq mi (266,000 sq km), NW Africa, occupied by Morocco. It borders on the Atlantic Ocean in the west, on Morocco in the north, on Algeria in the northeast, and on Mauritania in the east and south.
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 have hindered progress on the union's joint goals.

Maghreb

, Maghrib
NW Africa, including Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and sometimes Libya
References in periodicals archive ?
Khatibi's early views on the use of French by Maghribian authors reflected the revolutionary tone of the late 1960s: he saw writing as a means of passing beyond the contradictions of Western culture by destroying and re-creating the French language, thus attacking the heart of the culture from within with what Khatibi called a litterature sauvage.
Under the subtitle "Autres Oeuvres," Yusuf lists the following titles: Nafidha fi'l-Mazil al-Mughribi: [Stories] (A Window in a Maghribian House), 1979; Yawmiyyat al-Manfa al-akhir: [Essays] (The Diary of the Last Exile), 1983; al-Qunfud wa' l-hayya: [Children Songs] (The Hedgehog and the Snake), 1984; Sama' taht al-raya al-filastiniyya: [Essays] (A Sky Under a Palestinian Flag), 1984; Afkar bi Sawt hadi: (Thoughts in a Quiet Voice), 1989; Indama fi al-a'ali: [Verse Drama] (When in the Heights), 1989; Muthallath al-da'ira: [Novel] (The Triangle of the Circle), 1994.
He was one of the few French-speaking Maghribian writers to give sympathetic treatment to traditional Muslim life and values.