Magician


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What does it mean when you dream about a magician?

Dreaming of a magician doing tricks may indicate that an issue the dreamer is dealing with may be trickier than realized. Magicians can also be symbols of creativity or of evil.

References in classic literature ?
When it was lit the magician threw on it a powder he had about him, at the same time saying some magical words.
"What have I done, uncle?" he said piteously; whereupon the magician said more kindly: "Fear nothing, but obey me.
"Go down," said the magician; "at the foot of those steps you will find an open door leading into three large halls.
Then the magician brewed a powerful potion out of nine sorts of herbs which he had gathered himself all alone by moonlight, and he gave the youth nine spoonfuls of it daily for three days, which made him able to understand the language of birds.
The young man never halted in his flight until he reached the dwelling of the wise magician who had taught him the speech of birds.
--The poet and magician who at last turneth his spirit against himself, the transformed one who freezeth to death by his bad science and conscience.
--"Who art thou at all!" cried here the old magician with defiant voice, "who dareth to speak thus unto ME, the greatest man now living?"--and a green flash shot from his eye at Zarathustra.
He had talked to the man who called himself a magician, and not only surprised but scandalized the company by an equally sympathetic familiarity with the most fantastic forms of Oriental occultism and psychic experiment.
"Nobody sees anything except in the dark," said the magician.
He said there was hundreds of soldiers there, and elephants and treasure, and so on, but we had enemies which he called magicians; and they had turned the whole thing into an infant Sunday- school, just out of spite.
"It was not the devil," said the niece, "but a magician who came on a cloud one night after the day your worship left this, and dismounting from a serpent that he rode he entered the room, and what he did there I know not, but after a little while he made off, flying through the roof, and left the house full of smoke; and when we went to see what he had done we saw neither book nor room: but we remember very well, the housekeeper and I, that on leaving, the old villain said in a loud voice that, for a private grudge he owed the owner of the books and the room, he had done mischief in that house that would be discovered by-and-by: he said too that his name was the Sage Munaton."
"So it does," said Don Quixote, "and he is a sage magician, a great enemy of mine, who has a spite against me because he knows by his arts and lore that in process of time I am to engage in single combat with a knight whom he befriends and that I am to conquer, and he will be unable to prevent it; and for this reason he endeavours to do me all the ill turns that he can; but I promise him it will be hard for him to oppose or avoid what is decreed by Heaven."