Maglemose

Maglemose

 

a Mesolithic settlement near the city of Mullerup in Denmark. Archaeological excavations conducted at the beginning of the 20th century by the Danish scholar G. Saraw in a bog uncovered various remains. These included the bones of aurochs, red deer, elks, birds, fish, and the domestic dog and various implements made of flint (microliths, axes) and antler and bone (harpoons, arrowheads). The Mesolithic culture that has become known as Maglemosian (after the site) was widespread in Great Britain, Denmark, the northern part of the Federal Republic of Germany, the northern part of the German Democratic Republic, and southern and central Sweden and Norway. The culture primarily dates from the seventh to fifth millennia B.C. The population lived in small, primitive communes and engaged in hunting, fishing, and gathering. The working of bone, antler, and wood was well developed; dugout canoes and oars have been found.

REFERENCES

Ravdonikas, V. I. Istoriia pervobytnogo obshchestva, part 1. Leningrad, 1939.
Dolukhanov, P. M. Istoriia Baltiki. Moscow, 1969.
Clark, G. World Prehistory, 2nd ed. Cambridge, 1969.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Kongemose is the northernmost example of a Mesolithic culture belonging to the supra-regional trapeze horizon, which extended over most of Europe from about 6,700 BC, but was also deeply rooted in the local Mesolithic tradition as seen in the Maglemose culture.
Names such as Sami, Inuit and Chukchi may be familiar, but McCannon also introduces us to the Maglemose from the early Scandinavian cultures, the Komi from Siberia and the fabled Thule from Alaska, who extended their reach across the North American Arctic on a scale to rival the great sea voyages of the Polynesians.
1996): The Maglemose Culture: the reconstruction of the social organization of a Mesolithic culture in northern Europe.
5) At this point we should mention for example the so-called abandonment practices that are known from the areas of Maglemose Culture (Strassburg 2000, 109).