Magna Graecia


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Magna Graecia

(măg`nə grē`shə) [Lat.,=great Greece], Greek colonies of S Italy. The Greek overseas expansion of the 8th cent. B.C. founded a number of towns that became the centers of a new, thriving Greek territory. They were on both coasts from the Bay of Naples and the Gulf of Taranto southward. Unlike Greek Sicily, Magna Graecia began to decline by 500 B.C., probably because of malaria and endless warfare among the colonies. Only Tarentum (now Taranto) and Cumae remained individually very significant. Magna Graecia was the center of two philosophical groups in the 6th cent. B.C., that of Parmenides at Elea and that of Pythagoras at Crotona. Through Cumae especially, the Etruscans of Capua and the Romans came into early contact with Greek civilization. The following are the chief cities of Magna Graecia (those colonized from Greece, except Thurii and Elea, go back to the 8th or early 7th cent. B.C.; those colonized locally are perhaps a century younger)—on the east coast from north to south, Tarentum (colonized from Sparta), Metapontum (from Achaea), Heraclea (from Tarentum), Siris (from Colophon), Sybaris (from Achaea), Thurii (from Athens, replacing Sybaris), Crotona (from Achaea), Caulonia (from Crotona), Epizephyrian Locris (from Locris); on the west coast from north to south, Cumae (from Chalcis), Neapolis (now Naples; from Cumae), Paestum, or Posidonia (from Sybaris), Elea (from Phocaea in Ionia), Laos (from Sybaris), Hipponium (from Epizephyrian Locris), and Rhegium (now Reggio de Calabria; from Chalcis).

Bibliography

See D. Randall-MacIver, Greek Cities of Italy and Sicily (1931); T. J. Dunbabin, The Western Greeks (1948); A. G. Woodhead, The Greeks in the West (1962).

Magna Graecia

(in the ancient world) S Italy, where numerous colonies were founded by Greek cities
References in periodicals archive ?
From the Freelance Researcher (L.G.), Crotone, Italy; School of Dentistry (N.M.G.), University of Catanzaro Magna Graecia, Catanzaro, Italy; Private Practice (N.M.G., G.P.
Vitrine containing 19th/20th-century sculptures from Africa, a Corinthian helmet and reclining figure from Magna Graecia, both 5th century BC, and a relief from Saqqara; below: two Veracruz terracotta figures from Mexico
(2) Unit of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, "Magna Graecia" University of Catanzaro, Viale Europa, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy
(1) Department of Medical and Surgery Sciences, Clinical Surgery Unit, University of Catanzaro "Magna Graecia" Medical School, Viale Europa, Germaneto, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy
Legend has it that, upon tasting melas zomos, a man from Sybaris, or the opulent, ancient city of Magna Graecia, remarked in disgust: "Now I know why the Spartans do not fear death."
[1] Urology Unit, Magna Graecia University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy;
Women had no say in framing the sumptuary prescriptions in Athens or in Magna Graecia. The laws of Solon curtailed women's influence and restricted their opportunities to meet with other female members of the family.
Twenty-five-hundred years removed, a modern traveler can't help but look at the glorious remains of innumerable Greek temples, theaters, walls, vases, etc., in Paestum, Metaponto, Siracusa, and other cities in Magna Graecia -- the ancient Greek settlements in southern Italy beginning in the eighth century BCE -- without momentarily wondering if the Greek period was the golden period in the Boot's history.
Research led by the University Magna Graecia in southern Italy showed that the could offer an effective alternative for people unable to tolerate statins, which have been hailed as a wonder drug for reducing cholesterol, the fat-like substance that furs up arteries, triggering heart attacks and strokes.
Cannataro and Guzzi (both computer engineering, Magna Graecia U.
Historian (Listed) and Grecian Slipper (dam of Gr3 winners Magna Graecia and Graikos).
Cannataro is affiliated with University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Italy.