coil

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coil:

see inductorinductor,
electric device consisting of one or more turns of wire and typically having two terminals. An inductor is usually connected into a circuit in order to raise the inductance to a desired value.
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; solenoidsolenoid
, device made of a long wire that has been wound many times into a tightly packed coil; it has the shape of a long cylinder. If current is sent through a solenoid made of insulated wire and having a length much greater than its diameter, a uniform magnetic field will be
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.
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Coil

One or more turns of wire used to introduce inductance into an electric circuit. At power line and audio frequencies a coil has a large number of turns of insulated wire wound close together on a form made of insulating material, with a closed iron core passing through the center of the coil. This is commonly called a choke and is used to pass direct current while offering high opposition to alternating current.

At higher frequencies a coil may have a powdered iron core or no core at all. The electrical size of a coil is called inductance and is expressed in henries or millihenries. In addition to the resistance of the wire, a coil offers an opposition to alternating current, called reactance, expressed in ohms. The reactance of a coil increases with frequency. See Inductor

McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Physics. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

coil

[kȯil]
(control systems)
Any discrete and logical result that can be transmitted as output by a programmable controller.
(electromagnetism)
A number of turns of wire used to introduce inductance into an electric circuit, to produce magnetic flux, or to react mechanically to a changing magnetic flux; in high-frequency circuits a coil may be only a fraction of a turn. Also known as electric coil; inductance; inductance coil; inductor.
(science and technology)
An arrangement of flexible material into a spiral or helix.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Coil

One or more turns of wire used to introduce inductance into an electric circuit. At power line and audio frequencies a coil has a large number of turns of insulated wire wound close together on a form made of insulating material, with a closed iron core passing through the center of the coil. This is commonly called a choke and is used to pass direct current while offering high opposition to alternating current.

At higher frequencies a coil may have a powdered iron core or no core at all. The electrical size of a coil is called inductance and is expressed in henries or millihenries. In addition to the resistance of the wire, a coil offers an opposition to alternating current, called reactance, expressed in ohms. The reactance of a coil increases with frequency. See Inductor, Reactor (electricity)

McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Engineering. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

heat exchanger

A device designed to transfer heat between two physically separated fluids; generally consists of a cylindrical shell with longitudinal tubes; one fluid flows on the inside, the other on the outside.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

coil

1. an electrical conductor wound into the form of a spiral, sometimes with a soft iron core, to provide inductance or a magnetic field
2. the transformer in a petrol engine that supplies the high voltage to the sparking plugs
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
First, the brain effects in the first set of experiments could not be induced by a permanent magnet in the place of the magnetic coil. Nor could these effects be produced by a third magnetic coil placed directly above the head of the test subject and connected to a second magnetic coil through an amplifier with the second magnetic coil receiving magnetic pulses from a first magnetic coil after the said magnetic pulses first passed through the anaesthetic sample.
It would work by installing segmented magnetic coils on the road so electric vehicles retrofitted with a receiver would be able to charge while on the move.
The system Wang designed uses six magnetic coils placed in different planes around a microscope coverslip seeded with live cancer cells.
The bottom plate is lined with permanent magnets and the top (forcer) plate is lined with iron-core magnetic coils. Applying electric current to the coils creates electromagnetic energy that reacts with the magnetic flux of the permanent magnets to pull the forcer plate along the bottom plate.
The idea is to combine spherical tokamaks with high-temperature superconductors to overcome the problems created by pumping millions of amps through copper magnetic coils.
One of the teams, led by UW professor of aeronautics and astronautics Thomas Jarboe, is building a spheromak device, in which the magnetic fields are created by driving electrical currents into the plasma itself, rather than by external magnetic coils. "This is a much more elegant solution because the medium in which you generate fusion is the medium in which you're also driving all the current required to confine it," says doctoral student Derek Sutherland, who has been working with Jarboe.
In the same month, Scania also unveiled plans to begin testing wireless charging systems for buses by placing magnetic coils beneath bus stops and equipping the vehicles with induction coils to recharge the battery within minutes.
The ITER fusion machine is a "tokamak"-type reactor (Russian acronym for "toroidal chamber and magnetic coils").
When designing magnetic coils, one important consideration is how to keep them cool while all the electric power is dissipated in the wire by the Joule effect.
In addition, ITER Director-General Osamu Motojima and the Head of the Korean Domestic Agency, Kijung Jung, signed a Procurement Arrangement for the AC/DC converters feeding ITER'S magnetic coils. The components supplied by Korea will play an essential role to the plasma initiation, ohmic heating, plasma control, and for the full integration of the entire Coil Power Supply System (CPSS).
The design of some components, such as some of the magnetic coils, was changed."