magnetic resonance imaging

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Related to Magnetic resonance spectroscopy: Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

magnetic resonance imaging

(MRI), noninvasive diagnostic technique that uses nuclear magnetic resonancemagnetic resonance,
in physics and chemistry, phenomenon produced by simultaneously applying a steady magnetic field and electromagnetic radiation (usually radio waves) to a sample of atoms and then adjusting the frequency of the radiation and the strength of the magnetic field
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 to produce cross-sectional images of organs and other internal body structures. The patient lies inside a large, hollow cylinder containing a strong electromagnet, which causes the nuclei of certain atoms in the body (especially those of hydrogen) to align magnetically. The patient is then subjected to radio waves, which cause the aligned nuclei to "flip"; when the radio waves are withdrawn the nuclei return to their original positions, emitting radio waves that are then detected by a receiver and translated into a two-dimensional picture by computer. Unhampered by bone and capable of producing images in a variety of planes, MRI is used in the diagnosis of brain tumors and disorders, spinal disorders, multiple sclerosis, and cardiovascular disease. The procedure is considered to be without risk, but the scanner may interfere with pacemakers, hearing aids, or other mechanical devices. Although the images are similar in many ways to those of CAT scansCAT scan
[computerized axial tomography], X-ray technique that allows relatively safe, painless, and rapid diagnosis in previously inaccessible areas of the body; also called CT scan.
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, they are obtained without X rays or other radiation, and generally provide more contrast between normal and abnormal tissue.

magnetic resonance imaging

[mag′ned·ik ′rez·ən·əns ′im·ij·iŋ]
(engineering)
A technique in which an object placed in a spatially varying magnetic field is subjected to a pulse of radio-frequency radiation, and the resulting nuclear magnetic resonance spectra are combined to give cross-sectional images. Abbreviated MRI.
References in periodicals archive ?
Radiation-induced brain metabolic changes in the acute and early delayed phase detected with quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.
Cerebral abnormalities in patients with cirrhosis detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging.
Brain lithium, N-acetyl aspartate and myo-inositol levels in older adults with bipolar disorder treated with lithium: a lithium-7 and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.
Infantile Sandhoff's disease: multivoxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings.
Kushmerick M, Muscle energy metabolism, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and their potential in the study of fibromyalgia, J Rheumatol Suppl.
Biochemical changes in the frontal lobe of HIV-infected individuals detected by magnetic resonance spectroscopy.
Study participants had a combination of MRI, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and diffusion tensor imaging, as well as an interview, clinical assessment, and psychometric testing.
Magnetic resonance spectroscopy is not limited to the tumor diagnosis.
for his development of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for determining the three-dimensional structure of biological macromolecules in solution.
Called magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), it offers a unique way of diagnosing and monitoring breast cancer.
Magnetic resonance spectroscopy, or MRS, brings MRI full circle because the technology was originally developed not to make images of human beings but to scan laboratory samples for the presence of specific chemicals.
Researchers from the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg are using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to help differentiate between ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

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