Magnificat

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Magnificat

(măgnĭf`ĭkăt) [Lat.,=magnifies], song of the Virgin Mary, beginning "Magnificat anima mea Dominum" [my soul doth magnify the Lord], from Luke 1.46–55. It is the daily vesper hymn of the Roman Catholic Church and is usually sung at evening prayer in the Church of England.

Magnificat

Christianity the hymn of the Virgin Mary (Luke 1:46-55), used as a canticle
References in periodicals archive ?
Magnificat primi toni (1641); Magnificat secundi toni (1641); Magnificat tertii toni (1641); Magnificat quarti toni (1641); Magnificat quinti toni (1641); Magnificat sexti toni (1641); Magnificat septimi toni (1641); Magnificat octavi toni (1641).
In addition, each volume prints a seventeenth-century French translation of the Magnificat text, selected by Thomas Leconte, which may be of interest to scholars.
The psalms "the Holy Church ordinarily sings at Vespers" included by Gallo in this collection are the five psalms of the male cursus (Dixit Dominus, Confitebor tibi, Beatus vir, Laudate pueri, and Laudate Dominum) and the Magnificat (prints at this time often refer to the Magnificat as a psalm) for the feasts of Apostles and Evangelists and other male saints both de tempore and de commune, and the three additional psalms (Laetatus sum, Nisi Dominus, and Lauda Jerusalem) required, along with Dixit Dominus and Lau-date pueri, for the female cursus of Marian feasts and most feasts of female saints.
In the second Magnificat, the remarkably dissonant and chromatic passage at "Et misericordia eius" is worthy of note, as is the setting of "Sicut locutus est" for solo bass voice accompanied not only by the basso generale but also by a soprano da nascosto ("concealed [i.
He provides texts and translations for all of the psalms and the Magnificat and gives Viadana's preface in its original Italian and in a good, although not always precise, English translation.
All psalms begin with a plainchant intonation in a specific tone - only the Magnificats are sine intonatione.
The publication includes concerted settings of the versicle "Domine ad adjuvandum me festina," sixteen of the most usual Vesper psalms, and two settings of the Magnificat (one marked brevius, the other longius).
Two settings of the Canticle of the Magnificat conclude this opus.