Mahmud of Ghazna

Mahmud of Ghazna

(mämo͞od`, gŭz`na), 971?–1030, Afghan emperor and conqueror. He defeated (c.999) his elder brother to gain control of Khorasan (in Iran) and of Afghanistan. In his raids against the states of N India, Mahmud, a staunch Muslim, destroyed Hindu temples, forced conversions to Islam, and carried off booty and slaves. Hindus especially abhorred his destruction of the temple to Shiva at Somnath in Gujarat. Mahmud's territorial gains lay mainly W and N of Afghanistan and in the Punjab. At Ghazna (see GhazniGhazni
, city (1981 est. pop. 31,200), capital of Ghazni prov., E central Afghanistan, on the Ghazni River. Located on the Kabul-Kandahar trade route, Ghazni is a market for sheep, wool, camel hair cloth, corn, and fruit. The famed Afghan sheepskin coats are made in the city.
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), his capital, he built a magnificent mosque. His successors in the Ghaznavid dynasty, which Mahmud founded, ruled over a reduced domain with the capital at Lahore until 1186.

Bibliography

See biographies by M. Nazim (1931) and M. Habib (2d ed. 1967); C. Bosworth, The Ghaznavids (1973) and The Later Ghaznavids (1977).

References in periodicals archive ?
In the 11th century Turk ruler Mahmud of Ghazna launched a series of ferocious attacks against Punjab.
Askari makes a point of choosing a diverse group of mirrors, composed by authors from different social and professional backgrounds, in different cultural contexts and geographical locations--from northern Iran to India--and from the eleventh century to the thirteenth: the Pandnama attributed to Sebuktigin, which Askari takes to have been composed during the reign of Mahmud of Ghazna; the anonymous Addb-i saltanat va vizdrat; the Qabusnama of Kayka'us b.
Powerful intertextual references of Mahmud of Ghazna, the warrior king of Afghanistan, and his slave Ayaz, the symbol of a complete surrender for his master, enrich the text with a considerable strength.
The poem begins with the time of Sultan Mahmud of Ghazna and continues till the time of Muhammad b.
The author, Firdausi, presented his epic poem of 30,000 couplets, the result of 35 years work, to Sultan Mahmud of Ghazna in 1010AD.
In another example, Mahmud of Ghazna is praised as the great conqueror who invaded India 17 times and defeated the rulers of different kingdoms.
His particular interest lies with Mahmud of Ghazna (Ghaznavid dynasty, d.1030), Murad II (Ottoman dynasty, d.
The Shah-nameh of Ferdowsi was finally completed in 1010 and was presented to the celebrated sultan Mahmud of Ghazna, who by that time had made himself master of Khurasan, Ferdowsi's homeland.
One day, on returning from school, he asked, "Grandpa, do you know of Mahmud of Ghazna?"
Then advocate Akbar Lahori [a fine fiction writer of Punjabi language] started reciting Firdausi's verses which denounced Sultan Mahmud of Ghazna. Pressured by lawyers the magistrate granted the bail.
(8) The author's Ghaznawid background equally explains the original information we find about Ibn Sina's student al-Ma'sumi, which is that he was killed during the mass execution of so-called heretics and batinis by the troops of Mahmud of Ghazna in Rayy in 420/1029.
Dedicating his work to Sultan Mahmud of Ghazna, Ferdowsi updated the story to the time of the downfall of the Sasanid empire (mid-7th century).