Mehmed II

(redirected from Mahomet II)
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Mehmed II

 

known as Fatih (“the conqueror”). Born Mar. 30, 1432, in Edirne (Adrianople); died Apr. 3 (or May 3), 1481, in Hunkârçiri. Turkish sultan (reigned 1444; 1451–81).

Mehmed II conducted a policy of conquest and personally headed the campaigns of the Turkish Army. In 1453 he conquered Constantinople and made it the capital of the Ottoman Empire, thereby putting an end to Byzantium. Mehmed’s reign also saw the annexation of Serbia (1459), the conquest of Morea (1460), the Trabzon (Trebizond) Empire (1461), Bosnia (1463), and the island of Euboea (1471), the completion of the conquest of Albania (1479), and the subjugation of the Crimean Khanate (1475). The first law code of the Ottoman Empire was compiled under Mehmed II.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
321; y para la fecha de la muerte, BABINGER, Mahomet II ..., p.
over Persian Xerxes (whose father, Darius, had begun the conflict a decade before), Aeschylus' drama naturally lent itself to the current Greek struggle against Turkish Mahmud (whose ancestor Mahomet II had subjected Greece to the foreign domination she had been suffering for three and a half centuries)...."(10) Surely a liberal democratic poet wishing to celebrate a struggle for national liberation among the Greeks within the Ottoman empire would be only too eager to remind his readers of the celebration of a similar struggle that occurred centuries before.
Only at the final moment of that vision does he recognize with a shock the presence of Mahomet II and realize that the Islamites are attacking the city, not defending it.
By combining the love of Mahomet II with the military conquests of Amurath I (and the murderous dynastic succession following his death), a fusion not found in other sources or analogues, Goffe constructs a protagonist whose potential for social action is defined by the opposing demands of love and war, and both love and war become debased as Amurath navigates his way through their conflicting imperatives.
Knolles describes Mahomet II's dalliance with Irene as the product of 'disordered affections, where reason ruleth not the reine', a vice typical of the bombastic stage Turk.
over Persian Xerxes (whose father, Darius, had begun the conflict a decade before), Aeschylus' drama naturally lent itself to the current Greek struggle against Turkish Mahmud (whose ancestor Mahomet II had subjected Greece to the foreign domination she had been suffering for three and a half centuries)...." (10) Surely a liberal democratic poet wishing to celebrate a struggle for national liberation among the Greeks within the Ottoman empire would be only too eager to remind his readers of the celebration of a similar struggle that occurred centuries before.