Maja Desnuda

Maja Desnuda

Goya’s celebrated picture of woman in the nude. [Span. Art: Spain, 246–247]
See: Nudity
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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The Third of May 1808 and La maja desnuda are works by which Spanish romanticist painter?
Most people, however, associate with two paintings by Goya that now hang in the Prado: the Maja Desnuda and the Maja Vestida that supposedly depict the 13th Duchess of Alba clothed and nudebut that is another story altogether.
Significant also is his inclusion of actual framed reproductions of the paintings to which Manet's Olympia alludes: Titian's Venus of Urbino (1538), Goya's Maja Desnuda (1800), and Cabanel's The Birth of Venus (1863).
Examples include Conde de Osborne brandy's use of the enigmatic Mona Lisa and Spain's Travel Bureau's re-casting of Goya's "Maja Desnuda" as a centerfold-like "Playmate 1798" to lure tourists to its museums.
Based on Antonio Larreta's novel about the mysterious death of aristocratic floozy the Duchess of Alba and about the creation of Goya's celebrated paintings "La maja desnuda" and "La maja vestida," this 88 million production boasts elegant visual trappings and two strong leading women.
More popular novels--La maja desnuda (1906; Woman Triumphant), Sangre y arena (1908; Blood and Sand), Los cuatro jinetes del Apocalipsis (1916; The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse), and others--brought him fame but cost him critical approval because of their sensational nature.
At the turn of the 18th century, Francisco Goya painted "La maja desnuda," depicting a naked woman reclining on a bed, facing and boldly staring at the viewer.