Majorian


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Majorian

(Julius Maiorianus) (məjôr`ēən), d.461, Roman emperor of the West (457–61). He became emperor after he and RicimerRicimer
, d. 472, Roman general of the tribe of the Suebi. After winning (456) two victories over the Vandals, he allied with the senate and deposed (456) Emperor Avitus. Thereafter the true ruler of Italy, he erected a series of puppet emperors.
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 had deposed Avitus. An able and honest ruler, Majorian enacted laws to protect the people from unfair taxation and to preserve the ancient monuments of Rome. He attempted to recover the provinces but was defeated (460) in his expedition against GaisericGaiseric
or Genseric
, c.390–477, king of the Vandals and Alani (428–77), one of the ablest of the barbarian invaders of the Roman Empire. He led (429) his people from Spain into Africa, possibly at the request of Boniface, and quickly subdued a large
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. Ricimer, jealous of Majorian's strength, deposed him and had him murdered. Majorian's death was the beginning of the disintegration of the West Roman Empire.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Nonetheless, the Romans went down with a fight, as the accessions of the emperors Avitus, Majorian, and Anthemus were each followed by energetic military campaigns.
At the beginning of his reign each new emperor made a speech before the senators promising not to have them put to death tyrannically and not to believe informers (in 458 a puppet emperor, Majorian, was still saying the same thing to the Senate).
For example, during a 1999 House-Senate conference, Byrd instructed dazed listeners on the triumph of Scipio Africanus over Hannibal in 202 B.C., bolstering his case for loan guarantees for the steel industry with highlights from the life of Emperor Majorian. Sadly, neither the majority of today's politicians, nor the bulk of its journalists, has anything like the knowledge of Roman history that any educated citizen would have possessed a century ago.
The passage of interest here comes towards the end of Sidonius' panegyric of the emperor Majorian, delivered at Lyon in A.D.
To that extent, whatever his personal feelings about Majorian may have been, his encomium will undoubtedly have been |sincere'.
Far and away the most admirable of the western Emperors in the fifth century, Majorian was able, intelligent, and conscientious; his legislation marks him as Emperor of above-average ability, responsible for the last burst of glory of the Western Roman Empire.
420); he received a fine education; cooperated with Emperor Majorian's efforts against the Vandals, repulsing a Vandal attack on Sicily (461); Majorian's death compelled him to return to his base of support in Dalmatia, where he may have been magister militum (autumn 461); governed Dalmatia as a virtually independent state; accompanied the newly proclaimed western Emperor Anthemius to Italy (467); appointed commander of the Western Empire's armies, he took Sardinia from the Vandals; was murdered in Sicily (August 468).