Makah

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Makah

(mäkô`), Native North Americans who in the early 19th cent. inhabited Cape Flattery, NW Wash. According to Lewis and Clark they then numbered some 2,000. The Makah are the southernmost of the Wakashan branch of the Algonquian-Wakashan linguistic stock, being the only member of the Wakashan group within the United States (see Native American languagesNative American languages,
languages of the native peoples of the Western Hemisphere and their descendants. A number of the Native American languages that were spoken at the time of the European arrival in the New World in the late 15th cent.
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). Makah culture was fundamentally that of the Pacific Northwest Coast area. In 1855 they ceded all their lands to the United States except a small area on Cape Flattery that was set aside as a reservation. Today most of the 1,600 Makah in the United States live on the Makah Reservation; their main tribal income is from forestry.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gedosch (1968:100), wrote an interesting history of the dogfish oil industry in the Washington Territory and stated that "production and trade in dogfish oil was common to the Makah of Cape Flattery, the Layouts, Intimates, the Notches of British Columbia, the tribes inhabiting the lands fronting on Puget Sound, and, to a lesser extent, those living on the coast ...
Among the works of this prolific writer are two classic monographs on the Makah and Haidah Indians which were published by the Smithsonian Institution.
These include the use of nontraditional weapons and technology (50-caliber rifles and motorboats in lieu of harpoons and kayaks) and the failure of Natives (specifically the Makah) to sign pledges not to sell whale meat to Japanese markets.
Nancy Lord fails to mention that the Makah are hunting from a local-resident feeding group of no more than 200 whales, and that the Makah hunt weakens and corrupts the protections accorded the great whales worldwide under the auspices of the International Whaling Commission.
At least we were spared the "animal defenders" who were opposed to all whale hunting, like those who attempted to disrupt the resumption of traditional gray whale hunting by the Makah Indians of Washington State.