Makarov Basin

Makarov Basin

 

a depression in the floor of the central part of the Arctic Ocean, between Lomonosov Ridge, a spur of which divides it from the Podvodniki Basin, and the Alpha Cordillera. It is up to 3,940 m deep and the bottom is covered with silt. It was discovered by Soviet researchers in 1950 and named in honor of S. O. Makarov.

References in periodicals archive ?
The change has resulted in increased surface salinity in the Makarov Basin. Recent results suggest that the change also includes decreased surface salinity and greater summer ice melt in the Beaufort Sea.
The position of the front between the saltier surface waters of the eastern Arctic and the fresher western Arctic waters has advanced about 40 [degrees] of longitude across the Makarov Basin. As a result, the presence of Atlantic-derived water in the basin has increased, and the surface salinity in the Makarov has increased 2.50.
A less intense warm core appears over the Mendeleyev Ridge, and there is a general warming in the Makarov Basin centered near 200 m.
In particular, the researchers found that freshwater volume in the Canada and Makarov basins on the Pacific side of the Lomonosov Ridge increased by about 8,500 cubic kilometers (about 2,000 cubic miles), while the freshwater volume on the Eurasian area decreased by about 1,100 cubic kilometers (about 260 cubic miles).