Makeup air


Also found in: Acronyms.

makeup air

[′māk‚əp ‚er]
(engineering)
The volume of air required to replace air exhausted from a given space.

Makeup air

Outside air supplied to replace household air that was used in a combustion appliance or exhausted through a ventilation system.

makeup air

Outdoor air which is supplied to an HVAC system to replace exhaust air and any air lost by exfiltration.
References in periodicals archive ?
This study uses makeup air vents that have free area less than or equal to the cross-sectional area of the fire.
If anything, they had expected that the homes might be too airtight, guessing that new windows, insulation and other energy-efficiency measures would decrease the makeup air and interfere with the natural draft.
The garage entry on the left side is the source of makeup air. Figure 2 shows CO concentration assuming multiple ducted exhaust inlets per the CMC, while Figure 3 shows an unducted design with a single exhaust inlet on the side opposite the entry.
Due to the large amount of makeup air in the cleanrooms and the mission-critical cleanroom processes, correct operation of these freeze stats is crucial.
The work includes, but is not necessarily limited to, miscellaneous demolition of existing and provide new unit heaters, makeup air units, radiant tube heaters, louvers and dampers, and fans and all associated hangers, power wiring, ductwork, gas piping, etc.
The makeup air from the main part of the house should come into the closet near the ceiling or through the ceiling (see the "second thing" above).
Another common edict of smoke control is supplying makeup air at the floor level at very low velocities (200 fpm [1 m/s] maximum)--also typical for an open, atrium space.
In a standard HVAC system, a fixed amount of OA is taken in, either by itself (makeup air system) or mixed with a quantity of recirculated air (mixed air system).
Unless they are provided with net free ventilation area (NFVA) equal to or greater than their CFM rating, they draw the needed makeup air from the conditioned space: A/C in the summer and heated air in the winter if they are operated at that time of year.
Major equipment includes commercial kitchen exhaust fan, hood, and fire suppression systems; a makeup air unit with indirect gas heat and DX cooling; a gas fired water heater and storage tank, and indoor and outdoor grease traps.
The only field design required for the radiator is a source of intake or makeup air, and a duct enclosure from the radiator discharge to the building exterior.
As a result, the amount of heat generated at the stove top is less than traditional appliances, and exhaust and makeup air requirements can be reduced--especially when paired with proper exhaust hood design, layout, and flow control.