Malabar

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Malabar Coast

, Malabar
a region along the SW coast of India, extending from Goa to Cape Comorin: includes most of Kerala state

Malabar

 

historic region in South India between the coast of the Arabian Sea (Malabar Coast) and the mountains of the Western Ghats.

In ancient times and during the Middle Ages numerous principalities of Malabar were essentially independent, although from time to time they were associated with various unstable state formations (usually they paid tribute). The state of Chera, or Kerala (c. third century B.C. to c. ninth century A.D.) existed in the southern part of Malabar. The most important principalities of Malabar were Calicut (15th-16th centuries) and Travancore and Cochin (18th century). Malabar was the first region in India subjected to colonial plunder by the European states. In the 16th century Portuguese bases were established in Malabar. In the 17th century trading stations of the Dutch, English, and French were established there. The British-owned East India Company seized Malabar toward the end of the 18th century. The people of Malabar time and again rose up against the colonialists (the Malabar revolt of 1793-1806, the revolt of the Moplahs in 1921-22). In independent India the territory of Malabar has been a part of the states of Karnataka and Kerala since 1956.

REFERENCE

Alaev, L. B. luzhnaia Indiia: Sotsial’no-ekonomicheskaia istoriia XIV-XVIII vv. Moscow, 1964.
References in classic literature ?
At last, having seen the Parsee carnival wind away in the distance, he was turning his steps towards the station, when he happened to espy the splendid pagoda on Malabar Hill, and was seized with an irresistible desire to see its interior.
Bobby Wick, with an ugly bruise on his freckled nose, a sick and shaky detachment to manoeuvre inship, and the comfort of fifty scornful females to attend to, had no time to feel homesick till the Malabar reached mid-Channel, when he doubled his emotions with a little guard-visiting and a great many other matters.
The King of Malabar had shown to a certain Venetian a rosary of three hundred and four pearls, one for every god that he worshipped.