Diamondback Terrapin

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Diamondback Terrapin

 

(Malaclemys terrapin), a fresh-water turtle. The flattened carapace measures 15–20 cm in length in females, and 10–14 cm in males. The digits are webbed. The diamondback terrapin is found along the eastern seaboard of the USA, where it inhabits salt waters and brackish, swampy waters. It has a lifespan of 20–30 years. The female lays 20–30 eggs per season, which she buries in the ground near shores. The diamondback terrapin feeds on crustaceans, mollusks, and insects. It reproduces well in captivity and is raised for its prized flesh on special farms.

References in periodicals archive ?
Changes in population structure of diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin terrapin) in a previously studied creek in southern New Jersey.
The diamondback terrapin, Malaclemys terrapin, has a geographic range confined to salt marshes extending along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States.
Predation on diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin) eggs by dunegrass (Ammophila breviligulata).
Determinants of hatching success in diamondback terrapin, Malaclemys terrapin.
Cedar Point Marsh (CPM) has been identified as the location of the largest aggregation and nesting beach of diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) in Alabama.
Predation on hatchling and juvenile diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) by the Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus).
Turtles and tires: the impact of road kills on the northern diamondback terrapin, Malaclemys terrapin terrapin, population the Cape May Peninsula, Southern new Jersey, USA.
The incidental catch of diamondback terrapins, Malaclemys terrapin, in blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, traps has become an issue along both the Atlantic coast and Gulf of Mexico.
Other studies have concentrated on examining direct impacts of raccoons on prey species in marine coastal environments including eggs of diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin Feinberg and Burke, 2003; Butler et al., 2004), spiny-tailed iguanas (Ctenosura similes) (Platt et al., 2000), American crocodiles (Crocodylus acutus) (Fleming et al., 1976; Platt et al., 2000) and sea turtles (Ratnaswamy et al., 1997).
The diamondback terrapin, Malaclemys terrapin, was once an abundant species in the salt marshes of Alabama.
In Chrysemys, Deirochelys, Emydoidea, Graptemys, Malaclemys, Pseudemys, and Trachemys, the gular scute sulci are present on the entoplastron in adults, but the humeral-pectoral is not.