malapropism

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malapropism

1. the unintentional misuse of a word by confusion with one of similar sound, esp when creating a ridiculous effect, as in I am not under the affluence of alcohol
2. the habit of misusing words in this manner
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of the above may be considered malapropisms, the use of a legitimate word incorrectly in context.
For example the unfortunate use of 'toxic assets' - a malapropism if there ever was one and typical of American English - coined to conceal the simplicity and clarity of 'bad debt'.
11) Although malapropisms can be amusing, it all depends on your point of view.
A malapropism is the incorrect use of a word that is similar in sound to the one intended but has a different meaning, usually with a humorous result.
Monte's accessible adaptation accents the giggly abundance of malapropisms that mark the cunning wordplay.
With friends, we'll drag out her memory when the conversation needs a little brightener and recall her celebrated Malapropisms.
And she is back in the region from tonight, full of malapropisms, the unintentional and hilarious misuse of words, and no doubt laughs galore, in the process.
And writers and editors like to know about "nym" words (words about words) as well as about such things as palindromes, spoonerisms and malapropisms.
Here, Gillmore's penchant for malapropisms (as in the lyric, sexually evocative Your damp wounds will be sorely mist) and rebuses (as in Boo Fucking Hoo, in which a phallic appendage dangling from the first o in "boo" penetrates the middle letter of "hoo" painted below) finds expression.
This fun book, a mixture of puzzles and essays, covers an extremely wide range of topics, from the classics such as anagrams, palindromes, lipograms, charades and pangrams, to more specialized ones such as mnemonics, figures of speech, license plate language (IM LATE on a white Rabbit), shop names (Just Desserts, a confectioner), malapropisms, Tom Swifties ('I'll take the prisoner downstairs', said Tom condescendingly), and titles in search of authors (The Art of Hitchhiking by Nita Ryde).
After traveling with her uncle Alberico to Italy and New York (where she used to call him Unky Berky), she is touring Belgium with the same Alberjik, whose one and many "zoetrical" foibles are analyzed and detailed in Zapinette's supremely critical language, full of (more or less intended) malapropisms.
Many articles have been published over the years documenting the colorful range of malapropisms uttered by patients, transcriptionists, and, even physicians.