Malatesta


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Malatesta

(mälätĕ`stä), Italian family, ruling RiminiRimini
, anc. Ariminum, city (1991 pop. 127,960), in Emilia-Romagna, N central Italy, on the Adriatic Sea. It is a highly diversified industrial, commercial, and railroad center and a fashionable beach resort. Tourism is extremely important.
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 and nearby cities for almost 300 years from the 13th to 16th cent. Malatesta da Verucchio (d. 1312), a powerful Guelph leader, became (1239) podestà, or chief magistrate, of Rimini and used this position to entrench his family's position in the area. His hunchback son Gianciotto was married to Francesca da RiminiFrancesca da Rimini
, fl. 13th cent., Italian beauty, daughter of Guido da Polenta of Ravenna. She was married by proxy to the hunchbacked lord of Rimini, Gianciotto Malatesta; the proxy, Gianciotto's young and handsome brother Paolo, became Francesca's lover.
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. With the expulsion of the family's Ghibelline rivals in 1295 the Malatesta rule in Rimini became well established, but papal investiture was made only in the following century. Branches of the family came to rule also Pesaro, Cesena, and Fano. In the 14th and 15th cent. several members of the family were noted condottiericondottiere
[Ital.,=leader], leader of mercenary soldiers in Italy in the 14th and 15th cent., when wars were almost incessant there. The condottieri hired and paid the bands who fought under them.
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 in the service of various Italian states. The most famous was Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta (1417–68), a typical lord of the Italian Renaissance. A patron of arts and letters, he had the church of San Francesco in Rimini transformed into the Tempio Malatestiano [the temple of the Malatesta]. A despot excommunicated for numerous crimes, he engaged in a bitter conflict with the papacy over territorial claims, but he finally lost (1463) all his possessions except Rimini. His brother Novello, lord of Cesena, built there the fine Malatesta library. Sigismondo's son and grandson held the little state with difficulty, eventually losing it in 1500 to Cesare Borgia. Although the Malatesta family returned for brief intervals in the early 16th cent., Rimini passed definitively to the Holy See in 1528.

Malatesta

 

an Italian feudal family that from the late 13th to the early 16th centuries ruled in Rimini and extended its domination over part of Romagna and over Ancona of the Marches. The fierce struggle for power within the Malatesta family was accompanied by many perfidious assassinations; the tragic story of Francesca, the wife of one Malatesta in the early 14th century, has been immortalized by Dante in the Divine Comedy.

The most famous of the Malatestas, Sigismondo Pandolfo I (1417-68), surrounded himself with philosophers and scholars and collected a marvelous library. He also fought in many wars and served successively as condottiere of the pope, the rulers of Florence, and Alfonso of Aragon; in these wars he lost most of his possessions and entered the service of Venice. The Malatestas lost Rimini once and for all in 1528.

Malatesta

schemes outwit miser; enable young lovers to wed. [Ital. Opera: Donizetti, Don Pasquale, Westerman, 123–124]

Malatesta

an Italian family that ruled Rimini from the 13th to the 16th century
References in periodicals archive ?
Nicole Malatesta, of Coventry City of Culture Trust; Julia Negus, of Theatre Absolute and Tina Costello, of Heart of England Community Foundation
Victima de esa misma represion, en enero de ese ano Malatesta habia sido detenido en Ancona, donde dirigia el periodico L 'Agitazione, y despues de siete meses de carcel fue relegado a la isla de Ustica y luego a Lampedusa.
Malatesta is one of the best-known activists and writers in the 'canon' of anarchism.
The fruit of meticulous research over three years, the book's starting point is a letter dated 18 May, 1901 written by "the most important and feared" Italian anarchist, Errico Malatesta, from exile in London, to an anonymous comrade in Paris--identified by the authors as the painter Felice Vezzani.
Malatesta notes, “It's important understand why a professional security solution is absolutely essential in today's competitive and risky environment.
The groomsmen were Joseph Charles Tucker Davis, Derrick Shawn Godfrey, William Henry Grossenbacher Ill, Christopher David Hoal, Jacob Oakman Malatesta, and Bradley Allan Melancon.
O treinamento pliometrico (TP) e uma das formas de treinamento mais utilizadas no esporte coletivo (Impellizzeri e colaboradores, 2008; Meylan e Malatesta, 2009; Chelly e colaboradores, 2010; Campo e colaboradores, 2009; Ronnestad e colaboradores, 2008; Grieco e colaboradores, 2012; Rubley e colaboradores, 2011; Miller e colaboradores, 2006; Thomas, French e Hayes, 2009; Asadi, 2011) e envolve a execucao de saltos e quedas com alturas pre-determinadas utilizando o peso corporal e acoes musculares excentricas e concentricas, comumente conhecidas como ciclo alongamentoencurtamento (CAE).
In order to simplify and make the test more accessible, an alternative measuring procedure was proposed by Carmona Malatesta et al.
The opera's Indian prodigy as everyone would like to call him, is Vikrant Subramanian who adorns the role of Dr Malatesta, physician to Don Pasquale.
Among the topics are examining charisma in the light of Gandhi's moral authority, Errico Malatesta and charismatic leadership, Mao Zedong's charismatic leadership and the contradictions of socialist revolution, Western Europe at the end of the 19th century, and incendiary personalities.
In the set-up to teach Pasquale a lesson, baritone Adrian Kramer, as Malatesta, joined with Uloth in the powerful "Bella siccome un angelo" to sing the wonders of Malatesta's "sister" Norina.