malignant

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Related to Malignant cell: cancer cell

malignant

1. Pathol (of a tumour) uncontrollable or resistant to therapy; rapidly spreading
2. History (in the English Civil War) a Parliamentarian term for a royalist

malignant

[mə′līg·nənt]
(cell and molecular biology)
Pertaining to cells that have undergone phenotypic transformation by oncogenes or protooncogenes.
(medicine)
Endangering the life or health of an individual.
Of or pertaining to the growth and proliferation of certain neoplasms which terminate in death if not checked by treatment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Over time, the compressed malignant cells grew into more organized, healthy-looking acini that resembled normal structures, compared with malignant cells that were not compressed.
Similar MMP and gene-expression changes were induced in normal stem cells cultured alone and treated with interleukin-6, suggesting that inflammatory cytokines produced by malignant cells might cause the transformation to cancer stem cells.
Once docked, the vehicle unloads its "passenger," the cisplatin, into the malignant cell.
Researchers suggest that the vaccines will provide an alternative to chemotherapy, in which doctors give patients round after round of cell-killing drugs in the hope of destroying all the malignant cells.
This blood vessel growth, called angiogenesis, brings in nutrients and oxygen, enabling the malignant cells to continue dividing.
Moreover, GCS-100 induced significant programmed cell death in both malignant cell lines and primary patient CLL cells with minimal effect against normal B- cells and stem cells.
The most simple paradigm-yes in malignant cells and no in normal [nongermline] cells-is not absolutely true," says Richard J.
2,3,6) Previous studies have evaluated pathologist agreement when estimating percentage of malignant cells (concordance) and have illustrated the difficulty in using visual assessment to quantify absolute numbers of cells.
Using these tools, a pathologist can teach jurors how to distinguish the appearance of normal cells, atypical cells, and malignant cells.
It is reasonable to suspect that malignant cells with this ability express cell-surface molecules that enable them to initially traverse the perineurium.
Dr Berdichevski, a molecular biologist based at the Institute for Cancer Studies at the university, will examine tumour growth and the spread of malignant cells.