malignant

(redirected from Malignant cells)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

malignant

1. Pathol (of a tumour) uncontrollable or resistant to therapy; rapidly spreading
2. History (in the English Civil War) a Parliamentarian term for a royalist

malignant

[mə′līg·nənt]
(cell and molecular biology)
Pertaining to cells that have undergone phenotypic transformation by oncogenes or protooncogenes.
(medicine)
Endangering the life or health of an individual.
Of or pertaining to the growth and proliferation of certain neoplasms which terminate in death if not checked by treatment.
References in periodicals archive ?
The instructions included a brief description regarding the importance of accurate determination of the percentage, and participating laboratories were asked to identify who was responsible for determining the percentage of malignant cells and the method used for achieving that number.
When they did this, the malignant cells returned to their disorganized, cancerous appearance, negating the effects of compression and demonstrating the importance of cell-to-cell communication in organized structure formation.
Similar MMP and gene-expression changes were induced in normal stem cells cultured alone and treated with interleukin-6, suggesting that inflammatory cytokines produced by malignant cells might cause the transformation to cancer stem cells.
They have created a twin nanoparticle that specifically targets the Her-2-positive tumour cell, a type of malignant cell that affects up to 30 percent of breast cancer patients.
Immunohistochemical studies confirmed that the malignant cells were kappa-restricted plasma cells, confirming the diagnosis of plasma cell malignancy.
The aspirate showed malignant cells characterized by moderate to abundant basophilic vacuolated cytoplasm, round to irregular nuclei, dispersed chromatin, and prominent macronucleoli.
Tustin, CA) has patented a method for measuring the effectiveness of therapy intended to kill malignant cells in vivo in a mammal, comprising the steps of obtaining monoclonal antibody that is specific to an internal cellular component of the mammal but not to external cellular components, wherein the monoclonal antibody is labeled; contacting the labeled antibody with tissue of a mammal that has received therapy to kill malignant cells in vivo, and determining the effectiveness of the therapy by measuring the binding of the labeled antibody to the internal cellular component.
The mechanism fits into the handle of a scalpel and can distinguish between healthy and malignant cells.
Jones took a medical leave in December when it became apparent that he needed the transplant - the last option for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, in which malignant cells accumulate because they do not die.
One standard approach to curing cancer is to kill off malignant cells, and doctors consider their treatment a success when no cancerous cells remain.
8) The reasons for these higher risks are not clear, but two causes have been postulated: (1) immune dysregulation, which alters the immune system's ability to identify and destroy malignant cells, and (2) repeated or chronic antigen stimulation, which may lead to abnormal immune system activation.
When infused into a patient, these radiation-carrying antibodies circulate in the body until they locate and bind to the surface of specific cells, and then deliver their cytotoxic radiation directly to malignant cells.