Malthus


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Malthus

Thomas Robert. 1766--1834, English economist. He propounded his population theory in An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798)
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Third, de Waal devotes a chapter to what he calls 'Malthus's zombie'--the idea that 'overpopulation' causes famine.
Thomas Robert Malthus, David Ricardo, James Mill, John Stuart Mill, and other liberals, radicals, and reformers had a hand in conceptual transformations that culminated in the advent of neoclassical economics.
Those economists who speak of under-population or over-population relative to the natural resources of a country, are, like Malthus before them, only building far-reaching theories on a complete misunderstanding of man's infinite resourcefulness in the face of difficulties.
As an economist I was intrigued by the plot which was based on the essay of Thomas Malthus in 1798, who wrote on population, predicting that the natural tendency of population is to grow faster than the food supply.
Thomas Malthus, a British economist writing in the late 1700s, is the most famous of these.
Critique: The fourth novel in author Lin Wilder's popular Lindsey McCall series, "Malthus Revisited combines the innovative medical research with a new and terrifying threat to the world's population that is a biological time bomb.
1766: Thomas Robert Malthus, economist and author of An Essay On The Principles Of Population (1798), was born.
It is tempting to say that Hardin's essay has attained the same status and retained the same unflagging influence as Thomas Malthus's (1798) An Essay on Population.
Mayhew reframes Malthus, spatializing intellectual history by setting his thought on three scales: the global, the national, and the local.
The most common interpretation approaches it as a youthful flirtation, originating in his acknowledged intellectual debts to Thomas Malthus. In this telling, mature Keynes abandoned his early eugenic interests, or at least politely set them aside near the end of his life.
In 1798, with the world's population hovering at around one billion, English political economist Thomas Malthus wrote a fateful essay.
The Reverend Thomas Robert Malthus well represented the unspiritual, the uncreative masses of men whose whole nature was depraved and whose sole destiny was death--save for a meager elect miraculously salvaged by divine favor in this world as in the next.