Malthus

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Related to Malthusians: Cornucopian theory

Malthus

Thomas Robert. 1766--1834, English economist. He propounded his population theory in An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798)
References in periodicals archive ?
As Simpson correctly observes, the ecosystem services bandwagon is not riding on the old Malthusian rails.
Each new generation of Malthusians has made new predictions that the end was near, and has been proved wrong.
But population theory, in either a general form or in a specifically Malthusian guise, generated considerable confusion among American leaders as to what effects population growth would have on the peculiar institution.
The Malthusians are of the view that natural resources are limited and sooner or later the human population will exceed the carrying capacity of the planet.
To be sure, traditional Malthusians have their counter-arguments.
Pessimism about population growth has a long pedigree in economics, dating back to the Malthusian population principle.
He took the view neither of Malthusians, who felt that population would grow until it faced a binding resource constraint in the form of a limited food supply, nor of anti-Malthusians such as Esther Boserup,(21) who felt that though increasing population density may lead to pressure in the form of shortage, these shortages would lead to the development of better techniques rather than to a cessation in population growth.
Advances in extraction technologies appear to have delayed that day of reckoning, and given Cornucopians plenty of ammunition for bashing their longtime adversaries, the Malthusians.
Accordingly, beginning in the 1920s, feminists made common cause with Malthusians to launch the family planning movement.
The same type of cultural amnesia influenced the middle-class Malthusians, who just happened to benefit from cuts in the poor laws.
Together with the Malthusians, the adherents of a new science, eugenics, were rising to prominence.
When neo Malthusians suggest there are too many people for the land base, the food security position reveals several important particulars: that peasants seek land to feed their families, not because there are too many of them or too little land (at least right now) but because available land is occupied by other activities.