mammillary body

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mammillary body

[′ma·mə‚ler·ē ¦bäd·ē]
(neuroscience)
Either of two small, spherical masses of gray matter at the base of the brain in the space between the hypophysis and oculomotor nerve, which receive and relay olfactory impulses.
References in periodicals archive ?
The MRI revealed marked bilateral hyperintense lesions in medial thalami, and mild hyperintense lesions in the mammillary bodies and periaqueductal region in FLAIR, T2 and DWI sequences (Fig.
Specifically, the optic tectum, the inner cellular layer of olfactory bulbs, the periventricular pretectal nucleus, and the mammillary bodies were examined.
Central incisural herniation affects the mammillary bodies and the tuber cinereum differently.
A disproportionate role for the fornix and mammillary bodies in recall versus recognition memory.
Although our patient had some anatomic distortions, the location of the mammillary bodies was such that we could position our ETV just posterior to the dorsum sella.
A high cross-correlation was found between prelimbic cortex and infralimbic cortex (r = -.97, p < .001), between mediodorsal thalamus and dentate gyrus of the ventral hippocampus (r = .85, p = .01), between the medial lateral area and the medial area of the mammillary bodies (r = .96, p < .001), as well as between medial area of the mammillary bodies and dentate gyrus of the ventral hippocampus (r = - .86, p = .01) (Figure 1, Solid and dotted lines represent, respectively, highly positive and negative pair-wise Pearson's correlations [r > .8, p [less than or equal to] .02]).
This study highlights the importance of axonal connectivity for cognitive processes and suggests that impaired memory processing may impact other brain areas such as the mammillary bodies and septal nuclei via fornix connectivity.
Hypothalamus The ventral and medial portion of the diencephalons, which forming the walls of the third ventricle and lying between the optic chiasm (anterior limit) and mammillary bodies (posterior limit).
Obstructive sleep apnea, a condition in which you stop breathing periodically throughout the night, may affect your memory by depriving one brain structure, the mammillary bodies which assist in forming memories of a steady flow of oxygen.
The other study, published June 27 in Neuroscience Letters, found that sleep apnea (short interruptions of breathing during sleep) causes tissue loss in brain areas known as mammillary bodies, which help store memory.
The authors believe that lack of oxygen associated with sleep apnea may cause brain cell death in the mammillary bodies, leading to long-lasting brain memory impairments.