ramus

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Related to Mandibular ramus: mandibular condyle, mandibular angle

ramus

[′rā·məs]
(anatomy)
A slender bone process branching from a large bone.
(vertebrate zoology)
The barb of a feather.
(zoology)
The branch of a structure such as a blood vessel, nerve, arthropod appendage, and so on.
References in periodicals archive ?
A descriptive study was conducted using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to characterize the mandibular ramus area in adult patients who consulted in the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Unit of the Universidad de La Frontera, Temuco, Chile, measuring the distances between the mandibular canal and the alveolar, buccal and lingual margins.
Ramus width (RW): perpendicular distance between the deepest point of the anterior border of the mandibular ramus (R3) and the posterior border of ramus (R4) as described by Ricketts (1961).
Analysis of the condyle, articular fossa, and mandibular ramus in subjects with active condylar hiperplasia.
A fact that supports such theory advocates an embryologic premise, where the ossification of the mandibular canal takes place around the inferior alveolar nerve; hence, if this nerve presents variations, the mandibular canal will also present and may open posteriorly in accessory foramens or foraminas in the mandibular ramus (Ten Cate, 1998; Lipski et al, 2013).
The aim of the present study was to investigate the validity of mandibular ramus flexure in sex differentiation among Jordanian young adults using panoramic images in a double blind study.
A split thickness temporalis muscle and fascia flap was taken using AlKayat Bramley incision which was invested on the medial surface of the mandibular ramus and secured to the masseter muscle at the inferior border of mandible to prevent hetrotopic bone formation (Figure 6).
Condylar growth in posterosuperior direction leads to an increase in the vertical length of the mandibular ramus. The newly formed ramus remodels in a process characterized with periosteal resorption and endosteal bone deposition in much of the mandibular neck and ascending ramus of the mandible (Smartt et al, 2005).
The bone landmarks used to describe the topological situation of the mandibular foramen were: the lowest point of the mandibular incisure (I); the higher point of the inferior margin of the mandibular ramus (B); the most posterior point on the anterior margin of the mandibular ramus (A); the most anterior point on the posterior margin of the mandibular ramus (P).
All the jaws were inspected by a single observer and it was considered positive for the existence of the conduct of Serres, when it was verified, by means of a simple visual observation of the medial face of the mandibular ramus, the presence of a foramen, followed by a canal oriented antero-inferiorly, of postero-inferior location with regard to the mandibular foramen and that it allowed the introduction of 2mm of an semi rigid metallic instrument with 0.20mm diameter (Figs.
Some authors placed mini-plates or mini-screws into the anterior border of mandibular ramus and performed either en-masse distalization of mandibular dentition or tooth distalization (3-6).
The mandibular notch, also referred to as the incisura mandibulae or sigmoid notch, is a gap facing upwards and backwards occupying the superior margin of the mandibular ramus (Stedman, 2012; Mohammad et al.